If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Our reason for creating WWK originated as an outlet for our love of reading and writing mystery fiction. We hope you love it, too, and will enjoy our holiday gifts to our readers with original short stories to celebrate the season. Starting on 11/16 stories by Warren Bull, Margaret S. Hamilton, Paula Gail Benson, Linda Rodriguez, KM Rockwood, Gloria Alden, and E. B. Davis will appear every Thursday into the New Year.


Our November Author Interviews: 11/8--Ellen Byron, and 11/15--Sujata Massey. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


November Saturday Bloggers: 11/4 Margaret S. Hamilton and 11/11 Cheryl Hollon.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," just published, will appear in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.


James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, November 20, 2015



                                 Review of Death of a Ghost by Margery Allingham
                                                         By Warren Bull

In an effort at full disclosure I must admit I heard of Margery Allingham long before I read this book.  It is the first work of hers I have read.  I knew of her and Ngaio Marsh through their mention with their more famous contemporary, Agatha Christie as “Queens of Crime” during the golden age of mystery writing. Now that I’ve read Allingham, I’m determined to read March also to see if her work is as good as her peers.

In Death of a Ghost the author used an interesting hook on the first pages, which set the tone of suspense she sustained throughout.  Her protagonist, Albert Campion, is a modest figure who shuns the limelight and feels no need to trumpet his successes and skills.  He gets along well with the police detective who is his friend. The mystery is not a “who done it” but a “how can it be proven in a court of law.”

The characters are interesting and sympathetically portrayed.  Campion is the sort of person you might have a quiet lunch with to get his perspective on some problem that has been troubling you.  His foil is a flamboyant and deceivingly intelligent person who creates first impressions that require time and consideration to see through. 

As a reader I often told myself “Ah ha, that has to be a important” at times when I was reading. I was correct but the author was clever enough that I was never able to tell ahead of time why it would be important.

I thoroughly enjoyed the book. 


4 comments:

Margaret Turkevich said...

I'll have to root around the bookshelves and uncover my yellowed copies of books by Tey, Marsh, and Allingham. Thanks for the reminder.

Gloria Alden said...

Warren, I read her books years ago. I'm sure I still have some of them somewhere on my shelves as well as those by the others you mentioned. Sometimes it's good to read the older writers.

Kait said...

Sounds wonderful. I remember reading one of her books a number of years ago and loving it. I can't imagine why I didn't follow up with more of her reads. Thank you for reintroducing me.

KM Rockwood said...

Always good to be reminded of some of the classics! They are classics for a reason, and well worth reading. Or, more likely, re-reading.