If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Here are our September WWK interviews:

September 5: Marilyn Levinson/Allison Brooke, Read and Gone

September 12: Libby Klein, Midnight Snacks Are Murder

September 19: Annette Dashofy, Cry Wolf

September 26: Judy Penz Sheluk


Our September Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 9/1--Peter Hayes, 9/8--Wendy Tyson, 9/29--Catherine Bruns. Margaret S. Hamilton blogs on 9/15, and Kait Carson blogs on 9/22.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

KM Rockwood's new short story, "Map to Oblivion," has been included the anthology Shhhh...Murder! edited by Andrew MacRae and published by Darkhouse Books. It was released on Sept. 12.

Annette Dashofy's Uneasy Prey was released in March. It is the sixth Zoe Chambers Mystery. The seventh, Cry Wolf, will be released on September 18th. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Annette on September 19th.

Carla Damron's quirky short story, "Subplot", was published in the Spring edition of The Offbeat Literary Journal. You can find it here: http://offbeat.msu.edu/volume-18-spring-2018/


Tina Whittle's sixth Tai Randolph mystery, Necessary Ends, debuts on April 3, 2018. Look for it here. Tina was nominated for a Derringer Award for her novelette, "Trouble Like A Freight Train Coming."

James M. Jackson's Empty Promises, the next in the Seamus McCree mystery series (5th), was published on April 3, 2018. Purchase links are here. He's working on Seamus McCree #6 (False Bottom)


Dark Sister, a poetry collection, is Linda Rodriguez's tenth published book. It's available for sale here:


Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


Shari Randall's second Lobster Shack Mystery, Against the Claw, will be available in July 31, 2018.

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Friday, September 7, 2018

Three who Refused the Label of Failure by Warren Bull

Three who Refused the Label of Failure 

Image from Pixabay
  





The band: Johnny and the Moondogs, AKA The Quarrymen went through name changes before they settled on the name they became known by. Stu Sutcliffe, Tommy Moore, and Pete Best dropped in and out before the band settled on the permanent members. Band members swapped instruments. After a 30-set week of steady work, one of the members was deported which put an end to their plan. When they got an audition for a contract with Decca records, the company turned them down with the observation, “guitar groups are on their way out.” 

The beauty: It was a classic setup for failure. The beautiful, bright and charismatic young woman was hired for a television job she did not yet have the training and experience to pull off. Photogenic but underprepared, she was hyped to audiences so relentlessly that even the most professional and personable reporter would not have been able to live up to expectations. When she inevitably failed, she was demoted to writing and reporting where her careful wordsmithing was a liability. Her empathy was frowned on. Her boss told her she was too emotional and not right for television. 

The bit player: In college he took a theater class, hoping to meet girls. Whatever success he might have had on the romantic scene was not enough to compensate for his poor grades and missed classes. With no hope on the horizon that he might graduate, he dropped out. He moved to Los Angeles where he managed to get small parts on television, usually without lines and almost always cast as a hippie or a cowboy. When he got a small movie part, the reviews were negative. His director told him he did not have what it took to be a movie star. One movie director told him about Tony Curtis in a small part as a hotel clerk delivering a telegram. “I saw him and I immediately thought, “movie star.” 
“Gee,” this man replied, “I thought you were supposed to think hotel clerk.”

You might know them by what they became later.
The band persisted and kept playing until Brian Epstein discovered The Beatles playing to the packed club named the Cavern in Liverpool. 

The beautiful former news anchor took stock of herself and accepted a less glamorous position as co-host of a show that focused on human-interest stories. The show allowed her to develop chemistry with the other co-host, Richard Sher. For five years she honed her skills. When Oprah Winfrey was recruited to a morning talk show in Chicago, she was ready to show the world who she was whether the world was ready or not.

The actor taught himself carpentry to support his family. Even though he had no training in the craft, he became a master craftsman. He was good enough to work for members of the movie community. Steven Spielberg saw something in Harrison Ford and offered him a screen test. 

Labels applied to us by others, only stick if we allow them to.

2 comments:

Margaret Turkevich said...

Very eloquent, Warren.

KM Rockwood said...

This brings to mind the quote: "Luck is when preparation meets opportunity."

These people put a great deal into their preparation, and were ready when the opportunity presented itself.