If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our July author interviews: Ellen Byerrum (7/5), Day of the Dark anthology authors (7/12 and 7/19), and Nancy Cole Silverman (7/26).

Saturday Guest Bloggers in July: 7/1--Fran Stewart, and 7/8--Nancy Cole Silverman. WWK Saturday bloggers write on 7/15--Margaret S. Hamilton, 7/22--Kait Carson, and 7/29--E. B. Davis.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.”

In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on October, 18, 2017. Look for the interview by E. B. Davis here on that date!

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, June 23, 2017

The Killer Inside of Me by Jim Thompson: A Review by Warren Bull




The Killer Inside of Me by Jim Thompson: A Review by Warren Bull

Stanley Kubrick described The Killer Inside of Me as, “Probably the most chilling and believable first-person story of a criminally warped mind I have ever seen.”

I agree. First published in the United States in 1952, there are now 57 editions of the novel including several in languages other than English and at least two movies based on the novel.

The use of first person intensifies the experience of reading. Thompson manages to make the narrator both human and deeply disturbed. Deputy Sheriff Lou Ford is a well-respected resident of a small Texas town. The worst that can be said about him is that he’s a little slow and boring. However, underneath that appearance, what the deputy calls the “sickness” waits for the chance to flare again and dominate his personality. In the past his family was able to conceal the problem, to keep it under wraps and monitor him closely. When the sickness emerges again years later, there is no one to around to watch him; no one who even knows about the problem.


The writing is graphic in terms of being intense and engrossing. It is not needlessly gory.  It reminds me of the Alfred Hitchcock movie Psycho. The violence is largely implied. In the shower  scene the knife is never seen touching the victim. 

This is a classic novel of suspense. I recommend it highly.

4 comments:

KM Rockwood said...

I read this one years ago, and I agree with Warren. It is a classic--perhaps THE classic--psychological suspense novel.

Margaret Turkevich said...

I'm wondering when and where to read this...on a crowded beach or in a jam-packed train? Certainly not alone, in an empty house.

Grace Topping said...

That's the kind of book that keeps me awake nights!

write my essay for me cheap said...

Yeah, after reading this review, I feel that I am into Alfred Hitchcock’s suspense world. Thanks for sharing the review. There is a need of these kinds of novels.