If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Our reason for creating WWK originated as an outlet for our love of reading and writing mystery fiction. We hope you love it, too, and will enjoy our holiday gifts to our readers with original short stories to celebrate the season. Starting on 11/16 stories by Warren Bull, Margaret S. Hamilton, Paula Gail Benson, Linda Rodriguez, KM Rockwood, Gloria Alden, and E. B. Davis will appear every Thursday into the New Year.


Our November Author Interviews: 11/8--Ellen Byron, and 11/15--Sujata Massey. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


November Saturday Bloggers: 11/4 Margaret S. Hamilton and 11/11 Cheryl Hollon.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," just published, will appear in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.


James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Friday, June 2, 2017

Hand In Glove by Ngaio Marsh: A Review by Warren Bull


Image from Bigstock 
Originally published in 1962, Hand In Glove is the twenty-second novel by the author featuring Superintendent Roderick Alleyn of new Scotland Yard. Marsh wrote thirty-three mystery novels and published as late as the early 1980s.

In this novel there are a noblewoman with a reputation for throwing wild parties and changing husbands, a angry young lord with bizarre ideas and a man who sends a letter of condolence one day before the death of the subject of the letter. These characters, however, are not as interesting as the detective who, like many of the suspects, is a member of the upper class.

Marsh’s observations of the upper class and their foibles is implicit in this novel. Her continuing command of the English language and of the elements of a mystery are evident. A review in The New York Times notes, “She writes better than Christie.” A good argument could be made for that review.

All in all this is a well-written mystery that plays fair with readers. It is also, in my opinion, not her best writing. I recommend it highly, but if you want to read just one of Marsh’s novel, this is probably not the best choice.

6 comments:

KM Rockwood said...

Ah, Ngaio Marsh! An old favorite. It's probably about time for me to revisit some of her books.

Margaret Turkevich said...

I agree with Kathleen. I used to read them at my grandparent's cottage, but not in recent years.

Carla Damron said...

I love it that you are revisiting these old books. Maybe in 2060, someone will do that for our work!

Kait said...

I've got a couple of her books on my Kindle and I'm looking forward to meeting her for the first time. Thank you for the fair and balanced review, Warren. I just checked, Hand in Glove is not on my TBR. I've got a few of the earlier ones. At your recommendation, I think.

Gloria Alden said...

Warren, I'll have to check the boxes of books in my garage to see if I have any of her mysteries. I'd like to read at least some of them.

Susan Oleksiw said...

Marsh was always one of my favorites, and I read all of her books in the 1970s. HAND IN GLOVE isn't a favorite, and certainly not her best, but it does display her take on the upper classes. It's nice to see interest in her work revived here.