If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


June Interviews

6/02 Terrie Moran, Murder She Wrote: Killing in a Koi Pond

6/09 Connie Berry, The Art of Betrayal

6/16 Kathleen Kalb, A Final Finale or A Fatal First Night

6/23 Jackie Layton, Bag of Bones: A Low Country Dog Walker Mystery

6/30 Mary Keliikoa, Denied


Saturday WWK Bloggers

6/12 Jennifer J. Chow

6/26 Kait Carson


Guest Blogs

6/05 Samantha Downing

6/19 Lynn Johanson













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E. B. Davis's "The Pearl Necklace" will appear in the new SinC Guppy anthology The Fish That Got Away to be released in July by Wildside Press. The anthology was edited by Linda Rodriguez. It will be released on June 21st.


Paula Gail Benson's monologue "Beloved Husband," from the perspective of Norton Baskin the second husband of Marjorie Kinan Rawlings (who wrote The Yearling and Cross Creek), appears in the Red Penguin Collection's An Empty Stage (released March 28, 2021).


Martha Reed's "Death by GPS" will appear in the Spring 2021 issue of Suspense Magazine, which will be released in the second week of April. Congratulations, Martha!


Susan Van Kirk has a new audiobook, A Death at Tippitt Pond, that will be released this month. Marry in Haste will be released in May by Harlequin Worldwide Mystery, as will Death Takes No Bribes in September. Congratulations, Susan.


Congratulations to Martha Reed. Her short story, "The Honor Thief" was chosen for the 2021 Bouchercon Anthology, This Time For Sure. Hank Phillippi Ryan will edit the volume, which will be released in August at the time of the convention.


Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Killer Weeds," appears in the January 20 edition of Texas Gardener's Seeds: From Our Garden to Yours. Congratulations, Margaret, who, if you follow Facebook know, is a superb gardener herself!


Congratulations to Paula Gail Benson whose "Reputation or Soul" has been chosen for Malice Domestic 16: Mystery Most Diabolical anthology to be released this spring.


KM Rockwood's "Stay Safe--Very Safe" appears in this year's 2020 BOULD anthology. Congratulations, KM!


Annette Dashofy signed with agent Dawn Dowdle of the Blue Ridge Literary Agency. Congratulations, Annette!

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Sunday, August 4, 2013

The Waiting is the Hardest Part




For all the waiting in publishing, the worst is realizing you aren’t waiting on anything.

I’m paraphrasing, but that’s a quote from one of my wise writer buds, Dahlia Adler. And it’s extremely accurate, I think.

I recently finished the first draft of my latest manuscript. I wrote it faster than any other manuscript I’ve ever written — 92,000 words in about 10 weeks of part-time writing (and full-time working and life, of course). Not because I had a crazy deadline, but more because the thing just shot out of my fingertips. I couldn’t write the words fast enough, though no one was really waiting on it.

I’m happily blitzing through revisions now, but soon, very soon, the wait begins.

First, the wait to see what my critique partners say.

Then more revision.

Next, the wait to see what beta readers say.

Then more revision.

And the wait to see what my agent says.

Then (probably) more revision.

Next: Submission.

And finally, if I’m lucky: The wait for my book birthday (probably a cool 18 months to two years after signing a contract).

There is a lot of waiting in this profession. No matter your chosen publication path, chances are that if you’re a writer, your patience is constantly getting a decent workout.

As writers, sharing our words with others is a fabulous joy. You love your work and you instantly want others to enjoy it, too.

That wait to share it can be just a few minutes to edit and post a rough scene on a blog.

Or it can be months on end, playing the query game, waiting for an agent to love it.

Or it can be during submission, which, by all accounts, is a special level of check-your-email-and-your-phone-every-freaking-minute torture.

And then there’s the wait we all hope to go through, whether we chose traditional or indie publishing: The wait for your manuscript to become a real, live book, thanks to editing and formatting and a fancy cover.

Yes, waiting is universal. But as Dahlia points out, you can’t wait unless you’ve actually finished your manuscript.

How do you deal with the waiting?

8 comments:

Gloria Alden said...

Sarah, I do so understand that. I guess I deal with it by mostly putting it out of my mind and going on with something else, whether it's writing or some other thing. That doesn't mean it's not always nagging at my mind, though. I've had a lot of years at this waiting phase. It's one of the reasons I went the indie route, but then again there is still waiting there, too. In my case it was waiting, waiting, waiting for my cover. But it was all worth it in the end. And there were those exciting days when I heard a short story or poem had been excepted, too. That's when only my writing friends could totally understand the joy one feels.

Jim Jackson said...

For me, the easiest way to deal with waiting is to be working on the next thing.

I always have at least two projects going so even while I am waiting for the ink to dry on the first draft so I can make it into a second draft of one, another project is always at hand.

~ Jim

E. B. Davis said...

I've done the waiting game and know that it may all come to nothing. No holding my breath. I'm wondering all the while if there something I could change or add to make the manuscript better. I'm convinced that even when you think you are through, you're never through. Waiting is work. Good luck on the ms, Sarah.

Sarah Henning said...

I'm also a tinkerer, E.B., I have the worst time not just tweaking a manuscript, even if it's "done." Just can't do it. Thus, I'll most definitely end up editing the ms even more while waiting for my CPs and beta readers.

As for what I'll do when my agent has it and I can't touch it? Exactly what Jim does. Something new always helps in distraction! That's how this ms got itself written in the first place.

Gloria, I'm sure waiting for a cover is excruciating! And it is a joy. This whole field is a joy, even with the waiting.

Anonymous said...

Jim's right--the best way to deal with the waiting is to get to work on the next project.

The only real problem with that method is that sometimes I'm so immersed in the new project that, when I hear back about something, my reaction is "Huh? Did I really write that and send it off?"

Paula Gail Benson said...

Sarah, I love the picture you've included with your post. That's the perfect representation of time when you're waiting. Good luck and may you get happy answers!

Sarah Henning said...

Thanks, Paula! It's a Dali painting that I love. I studied abroad in Barcelona and went to the museum he created for his artwork. It was insane and insanely fun. I'm wondering if Dali knew the waiting game as well as writers!

KM, yes, that's totally true. I'm very distracted with this side project.

Sarah said...

For me waiting is one of the toughest parts of this whole process. The only way to keep myself from going insane is to stay busy with other projects.