If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


February Interviews













2/5 Heather Weidner, Glitter, Glam, and Contraband
2/12 Rhys Bowen, Above The Bay of Angels
2/19 Elizabeth Penney, Hems & Homicide
2/26 Annette Dashofy, Under The Radar


Saturday Guest Bloggers:
2/1 Valerie Burns
2/8 Jeannette de Beauvoir
2/15 Kathryn Lane

WWK Bloggers: 2/22 Kait Carson, 1/28 & 1/29 Special Interviews with Agatha Nominees by Paula Gail Benson

*************************************************************************

WWK is proud of our four Agatha nominees. Kaye George for Best Short Story--not her first time to be nominated, Connie Berry and Grace Topping for Best First Mystery Novel (wish they weren't having to compete against each other), and Annette Dashofy for Best Contemporary Novel--her fifth nomination!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Look for Kaye George and Margaret S. Hamilton's short stories in the new Mid-Century Murder by Darkhouse Books. Kaye's story is "Life and Death on the Road" and Margaret's story is titled "4BR/3.5BA Contemporary."


Kaye George's first novel in the Vintage Sweets mystery series, Revenge is Sweet, will be released on March 10th. Look for the interview here on March 11.


Grace Topping's second novel in Laura Bishop staging series, Staging Wars, will be released by Henery Press on April 28th. Look for the interview here on April 29th.


Don't miss Shari Randall's "The Queen of Christmas" available on at Amazon. Shari's holiday story for WWK was too long so she published it for our enjoyment. It's available for 99 cents or on Kindle Unlimited for free!


KM Rockwood's "The Society" and "To Die A Free Man; the Story of Joseph Bowers" are included in the BOULD Awards Anthology, which was released on November 19. KM won second place with a cash prize for "The Society." Congratulations, KM! Kaye George's "Meeting on the Funicular" is also in this anthology, which can be bought for 99 cents on Kindle until November 30.


Paula Gail Benson's story "Wisest, Swiftest, Kindest" appears in Love in the Lowcountry an anthology by the Lowcountry Romance Writers available 11/5 in e-book and print format on Amazon. The anthology includes fourteen stories all based in Charleston, South Carolina.


Kaye George's "Grist for the Mill" was published in A Murder of Crows anthology, edited by Sandra Murphy on October 9th.



Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

Susan Van Kirk's A Death At Tippett Pond was released on June 15th. Read E. B. Davis's interview with Susan.

Warren Bull's Abraham Lincoln: Seldom Told Stories was released. It is available at: GoRead: https://www.goread.com/book/abraham-lincoln-seldom-told-stories or at Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/ydaklx8p

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Friday, August 23, 2013

Why Attend a "Write Time" when Nobody Talks?


Why Attend A “Write Time” When Nobody Talks?

I went to Cedar Roe Library in Roeland Park, Kansas, from 10:30 to noon recently.  I sat at a table with other people and typed.  There were four tables of people typing, and not talking.  When I got home my wife asked, “How did it go?” I answered. “It went well.”  She then asked, “If nobody talks, why even attend?”

I will attempt to answer that question.  Um.  I know I can sit in my “man cave” by myself and write. I can. I do. It works.

But it is also works to sit in a room with others who are also writing and not talk to them. Organizer Nancy Pickard compares this to “parallel play.” Child development specialists have observed that between roughly 10 to 17 months of age infants start watching other infants playing near them although the infants do not interact. This is a precursor to and a step toward, interactive play - sharing, negotiating and responding to others.

It’s nice to see that others interact with the voices in their heads and work, even though from the outside it may not seem like work at all. There is something emotionally supportive about being in a room with other writers and writing.  It may be true for other art forms too. I’m not sure.  But although writing involves a great deal of “inside the head work” it also requires interaction with others.

Sometimes it is a quiet interaction when the sounds of keys clicking and pens scratching is almost musical.

Does it make sense to you?

Note: I will still be on the other side of the world on safari in Tanzania when this blog goes up. I will read the comments when I return.

3 comments:

Gloria Alden said...

We all have our comfort zones for writing. It's one of the things that makes us unique. Myself, I prefer to write in the environs of my home, but I know lots of people like to write in libraries, cafes or on trains. It's what works for you, Warren.

Paula Gail Benson said...

Warren, I appreciate this perspective. Several of these have taken place in my area, and I've wondered how they work and how productive they are. This helps explain. Thanks.

Kara Cerise said...

I'm more productive when I'm working with other people. When I see someone immersed in writing, it motivates me to do the same.