If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


June Interviews

6/02 Terrie Moran, Murder She Wrote: Killing in a Koi Pond

6/09 Connie Berry, The Art of Betrayal

6/16 Kathleen Kalb, A Final Finale or A Fatal First Night

6/23 Jackie Layton, Bag of Bones: A Low Country Dog Walker Mystery

6/30 Mary Keliikoa, Denied


Saturday WWK Bloggers

6/12 Jennifer J. Chow

6/26 Kait Carson


Guest Blogs

6/05 Samantha Downing

6/19 Lynn Johanson













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E. B. Davis's "The Pearl Necklace" will appear in the new SinC Guppy anthology The Fish That Got Away to be released in July by Wildside Press. The anthology was edited by Linda Rodriguez. It will be released on June 21st.


Paula Gail Benson's monologue "Beloved Husband," from the perspective of Norton Baskin the second husband of Marjorie Kinan Rawlings (who wrote The Yearling and Cross Creek), appears in the Red Penguin Collection's An Empty Stage (released March 28, 2021).


Martha Reed's "Death by GPS" will appear in the Spring 2021 issue of Suspense Magazine, which will be released in the second week of April. Congratulations, Martha!


Susan Van Kirk has a new audiobook, A Death at Tippitt Pond, that will be released this month. Marry in Haste will be released in May by Harlequin Worldwide Mystery, as will Death Takes No Bribes in September. Congratulations, Susan.


Congratulations to Martha Reed. Her short story, "The Honor Thief" was chosen for the 2021 Bouchercon Anthology, This Time For Sure. Hank Phillippi Ryan will edit the volume, which will be released in August at the time of the convention.


Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Killer Weeds," appears in the January 20 edition of Texas Gardener's Seeds: From Our Garden to Yours. Congratulations, Margaret, who, if you follow Facebook know, is a superb gardener herself!


Congratulations to Paula Gail Benson whose "Reputation or Soul" has been chosen for Malice Domestic 16: Mystery Most Diabolical anthology to be released this spring.


KM Rockwood's "Stay Safe--Very Safe" appears in this year's 2020 BOULD anthology. Congratulations, KM!


Annette Dashofy signed with agent Dawn Dowdle of the Blue Ridge Literary Agency. Congratulations, Annette!

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Friday, August 23, 2013

Why Attend a "Write Time" when Nobody Talks?


Why Attend A “Write Time” When Nobody Talks?

I went to Cedar Roe Library in Roeland Park, Kansas, from 10:30 to noon recently.  I sat at a table with other people and typed.  There were four tables of people typing, and not talking.  When I got home my wife asked, “How did it go?” I answered. “It went well.”  She then asked, “If nobody talks, why even attend?”

I will attempt to answer that question.  Um.  I know I can sit in my “man cave” by myself and write. I can. I do. It works.

But it is also works to sit in a room with others who are also writing and not talk to them. Organizer Nancy Pickard compares this to “parallel play.” Child development specialists have observed that between roughly 10 to 17 months of age infants start watching other infants playing near them although the infants do not interact. This is a precursor to and a step toward, interactive play - sharing, negotiating and responding to others.

It’s nice to see that others interact with the voices in their heads and work, even though from the outside it may not seem like work at all. There is something emotionally supportive about being in a room with other writers and writing.  It may be true for other art forms too. I’m not sure.  But although writing involves a great deal of “inside the head work” it also requires interaction with others.

Sometimes it is a quiet interaction when the sounds of keys clicking and pens scratching is almost musical.

Does it make sense to you?

Note: I will still be on the other side of the world on safari in Tanzania when this blog goes up. I will read the comments when I return.

3 comments:

Gloria Alden said...

We all have our comfort zones for writing. It's one of the things that makes us unique. Myself, I prefer to write in the environs of my home, but I know lots of people like to write in libraries, cafes or on trains. It's what works for you, Warren.

Paula Gail Benson said...

Warren, I appreciate this perspective. Several of these have taken place in my area, and I've wondered how they work and how productive they are. This helps explain. Thanks.

Kara Cerise said...

I'm more productive when I'm working with other people. When I see someone immersed in writing, it motivates me to do the same.