If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our September Author Interviews--9/6 Kathleen Valenti, 9/13 David Burnsworth, 9/20 Jeri Westerson, 9/27 Frances Brody. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.

September Saturday Guest Bloggers: 9/2--Anne Bannon, 9/9 WWK Bloggers, 9/16 Margaret S. Hamilton, 9/23 Kait Carson, and on 9/30 Trixie Stiletto.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.” In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.
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Friday, August 17, 2012

A Boy and his Bookstore


A Boy and his Bookshop: A tragedy in three acts






Okay, nobody’s bones were ground up and baked into bread.  There was no exchange of severed heads.  So maybe the tragedy does not quite reach Shakespearian levels.




Still, I Love a Mystery bookstore closed, sprang back to life and closed a second time.  I don’t think even Lazarus got a third chance.  The first time the store closed  was half way around the world in New Zealand.  The shock was cushioned by my being too far away to experience it in person.  The earth shook (repeatedly) but no graves gave up their dead. No comets scorched the night skies. I suspect the shaking was due a series of earthquakes along the ring of fire.  It might not have been related to the store closing at all.



After returning to the United States, a real estate deal fell through and I Love a Mystery unexpectedly reopened.  Alas, poor mortal fool that I am, I did not full savor the autumnal moments with my beloved store.  My idle dallying with other independent bookstores ‘twas only when I was bespelled by their glimmering tomes.




ILM held my heart and graced my dreams.  Oh store, you gave your honors to the world again. Your blessed part is in heaven. May you sleep in peace.




13 comments:

Linda Rodriguez said...

Yes, Warren, what a loss! And the sad thing was that they were doing so well after re-opening. Unlike most indie bookstore closings, this one was not due to poor sales.

We are fortunate in Kansas City to have another nationally known independent bookstore, Rainy Day Books, and The Raven, a mystery-oriented bookstore in Lawrence. Could we say Lawrence is an exurb of KC?

The bittersweet, of course, lies in the opening of Mysteryscape bookstore. So many cities lose a major indie bookstore without anything coming in to replace it. It seems as if every week or so I hear of something like that on Twitter. While I say the kaddish in ashes and sackcloth mourning for wonderful I Love A Mystery, I welcome the newcomer and count my blessings.

Jacqueline Seewald said...

In my area, we lost both the Borders and B&N bookstores. There are no Indy stores either. It's very discouraging. I hate seeing small bookstores in particular closing.
Is Amazon gobbling up most of the business these days?

Jacqueline Seewald
DEATH LEGACY

Warren Bull said...

LInda,

I join you in your sentiments. Rainy Day Books is a local institution, the oldest independent bookstore in town and Mysteryscape is a very welcome new comer,

E. B. Davis said...

I'm sorry, Warren. BAM is the only bookstore close to me now, and I've never liked their organization of books on the shelves and their limited range of books. Bookstores specializing in mystery are best for me. My only recourse is to buy from those remaining online. The Chesapeake Chapter's choice stocks all of the chapter's authors' books and our anthologies. I hope another one opens near you. Liked the blog!

Alice Duncan said...

So sad when any independent bookstore closes. I'm sorry :(

Warren Bull said...

Jacqueline,

I'm afraid so. Amazon seems to be after publishers too.

Warren Bull said...

Alice, Thanks for the sympathy. That store was wonderful to writers as well as readers.

Gloria Alden said...

Our only independent book store, The Booknook closed up quite a few years ago. Recently Borders closed and Barnes and Noble is at least 25miles away. BAM went in, but like E.B. said, it's not the same. I miss both my indie book store and Borders. There's something more personal about the indies - and even Borders, to some extent. BAM has no place to sit and browse through books or visit for a few moments with fellow book lovers.

My only other option is a small, but very nice, used book store in a small town nearby that carries a wide range of books including mysteries. The owner, Ellen Eckhouse, has a large inventory.

Warren Bull said...

EB, Thanks. I hope you get an indie near you.

Warren Bull said...

Gloria, I love little bookstores and the people in them.

marja said...

Warren, Seeing bookstores closing is heartbreaking. We only have one store in my area, and they do more business with movies and music rather than books, and that breaks my heart, too.

Warren Bull said...

Marja,

So many bookstores have closed. It is sad.

jenny milchman said...

I'd thought it was back for good, and I mourn a little bit with you, Warren. On a happier note, bookstores are opening and expanding as we travel across the country. But the closing of even a one is a real cultural loss.