If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


May Interviews

5/5 Lynn Calhoon, Murder 101
5/12 Annette Dashofy, Death By Equine
5/19 Krista Davis, The Diva Serves Forbidden Fruit
5/25 Debra Goldstein, Four Cuts Too Many

Saturday WWK Bloggers

5/1 V. M. Burns
5/8 Jennifer Chow
5/22 Kait Carson

Guest Blogs

5/15 M. K. Scott













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E. B. Davis's "The Pearl Necklace" will appear in the new SinC Guppy anthology The Fish That Got Away to be released in July by Wildside Press. The anthology was edited by Linda Rodriguez.

Paula Gail Benson's monologue "Beloved Husband," from the perspective of Norton Baskin the second husband of Marjorie Kinan Rawlings (who wrote The Yearling and Cross Creek), appears in the Red Penguin Collection's An Empty Stage (released March 28, 2021).

Martha Reed's "Death by GPS" will appear in the Spring 2021 issue of Suspense Magazine, which will be released in the second week of April. Congratulations, Martha!

Susan Van Kirk has a new audiobook, A Death at Tippitt Pond, that will be released this month. Marry in Haste will be released in May by Harlequin Worldwide Mystery, as will Death Takes No Bribes in September. Congratulations, Susan.

Congratulations to Martha Reed. Her short story, "The Honor Thief" was chosen for the 2021 Bouchercon Anthology, This Time For Sure. Hank Phillippi Ryan will edit the volume, which will be released in August at the time of the convention.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Killer Weeds," appears in the January 20 edition of Texas Gardener's Seeds: From Our Garden to Yours. Congratulations, Margaret, who, if you follow Facebook know, is a superb gardener herself!

Congratulations to Jennifer J. Chow for garnering a 2021 Lefty Nomination for Best Humorous Mystery Novel. We're crossing our fingers for Jennifer!

Congratulations to Paula Gail Benson whose "Reputation or Soul" has been chosen for Malice Domestic 16: Mystery Most Diabolical anthology to be released this spring.

KM Rockwood's "Stay Safe--Very Safe" appears in this year's 2020 BOULD anthology. Congratulations, KM!

Annette Dashofy signed with agent Dawn Dowdle of the Blue Ridge Literary Agency. Congratulations, Annette!

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Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Dressing the Author

What an author wears at a public appearance can help or harm her chances of being remembered. Many will dress in a way to show off their work and catch the eye of those who attend. One author always wears purple. Another dresses as her two protagonists, one on each side. While I thought the woman dressed as her two protagonists looked silly, I have remembered her for almost 20 years.

On Saturday I am going to an author extravaganza at one of the local shopping malls. For once an event that is likely to have actual readers looking at my work. So I have my books together, and some decoration for my table, perhaps a quill pen or a drop spindle.

I have a pile of brochures for the sites that are the inspirations for setting and character. My big question is what do I wear?

I have never been a very classy dresser. Since I retired from my day job, my attire consists of jeans and a tee-shirt. My favorite shirts represent things I have done or places I have been or organizations I belong to. I have a bright red Sisters in Crime shirt, a Dominique chicken shirt, a bunch from various horse events. When I am working at one of the sites, I wear jeans and a proper shirt, Greenbank tee-shirts or Newlin Grist Mill staff polo shirts, or period clothing.

I own a couple of dresses still, and two decent pair of trousers. Nothing matches. When my first book was published I bought a black knit dress that could be worn with any of my jackets and blazers. My author’s little black dress. ALBD for short.

At my first book event, the man at the table next to me was in the Civil War uniform of a Union sergeant. Everyone stopped to talk to him. I don’t know how many books he sold, but he sure drew the crowd’s attention. My ALBD attracted no attention.

Taking a tip from him, I dress in period clothing when ever I can. I can dress to illustrate most of the periods I write, Colonial, New Republic, Civil War and Victorian. If I dress in period clothing I stand in front of the table and greet people as they come by. Often I will have something on my table for them to do, write with a quill pen, try to spin a bit of wool, anything to get their hands busy and their minds working. I am happy to talk about what I am wearing and why.

Tomorrow I will be sitting behind a table with no way out, so period clothing has less impact.

This is what I will be wearing: dressy teal tee-top with narrow lace at the neck edge, off white trousers and my ink pot and pen lovelier. Period clothing next time.

3 comments:

Warren Bull said...

I favor period clothing so people can talk to me while they don't buy my books. My best look is a Guys and Dolls gangster, followed by an 1840s prosperous attorney. For sitting behind a table (a terrible setting) I wonder if you have considered a Charlotte O'Hara broad hat and a hand fan.

Gloria Alden said...

Love your pictures, KB. I enjoy any reenacting experience.

You and Warren are both lucky that you can dress in period clothing for book signings. I agree with Warren, that even behind a table you can dress in something that shows the period. I can't think of anything I could wear as eye catching as what you would wear. I'd feel ridiculous wearing a garden hat and gardening gloves.

Warren Bull said...

i meant Scarlett O'Hara.