If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


May Interviews

5/5 Lynn Calhoon, Murder 101
5/12 Annette Dashofy, Death By Equine
5/19 Krista Davis, The Diva Serves Forbidden Fruit
5/25 Debra Goldstein, Four Cuts Too Many

Saturday WWK Bloggers

5/1 V. M. Burns
5/8 Jennifer Chow
5/22 Kait Carson

Guest Blogs

5/15 M. K. Scott













*************************************************************************************************

E. B. Davis's "The Pearl Necklace" will appear in the new SinC Guppy anthology The Fish That Got Away to be released in July by Wildside Press. The anthology was edited by Linda Rodriguez.

Paula Gail Benson's monologue "Beloved Husband," from the perspective of Norton Baskin the second husband of Marjorie Kinan Rawlings (who wrote The Yearling and Cross Creek), appears in the Red Penguin Collection's An Empty Stage (released March 28, 2021).

Martha Reed's "Death by GPS" will appear in the Spring 2021 issue of Suspense Magazine, which will be released in the second week of April. Congratulations, Martha!

Susan Van Kirk has a new audiobook, A Death at Tippitt Pond, that will be released this month. Marry in Haste will be released in May by Harlequin Worldwide Mystery, as will Death Takes No Bribes in September. Congratulations, Susan.

Congratulations to Martha Reed. Her short story, "The Honor Thief" was chosen for the 2021 Bouchercon Anthology, This Time For Sure. Hank Phillippi Ryan will edit the volume, which will be released in August at the time of the convention.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Killer Weeds," appears in the January 20 edition of Texas Gardener's Seeds: From Our Garden to Yours. Congratulations, Margaret, who, if you follow Facebook know, is a superb gardener herself!

Congratulations to Jennifer J. Chow for garnering a 2021 Lefty Nomination for Best Humorous Mystery Novel. We're crossing our fingers for Jennifer!

Congratulations to Paula Gail Benson whose "Reputation or Soul" has been chosen for Malice Domestic 16: Mystery Most Diabolical anthology to be released this spring.

KM Rockwood's "Stay Safe--Very Safe" appears in this year's 2020 BOULD anthology. Congratulations, KM!

Annette Dashofy signed with agent Dawn Dowdle of the Blue Ridge Literary Agency. Congratulations, Annette!

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thursday, June 25, 2020

Homesick For A Village That Doesn't Exist by Connie Berry




I do so hate finishing books. I would like to go on with them forever. Beatrix Potter

Finishing books—and leaving the world you've created—is always a kind of emotionally wrenching experience. I usually cry. Lauren Oliver


Last week I turned in the manuscript for The Art of Betrayal, the third book in the Kate Hamilton Mystery series. It's not finished. Rounds of edits come next, but pushing send is a milestone marking the end of something cherished. Here's a glimpse:

American antiques dealer Kate Hamilton is spending the month of May in the Suffolk village of Long Barston, filling in at her friend Ivor Tweedy's antiquities shop while he recovers from bilateral hip surgery. Kate is thrilled when a local recluse consigns a valuable Chinese pottery jar from the ancient Han dynasty—until the jar goes missing and a body turns up in the middle of a village pageant celebrating an eleventh-century folktale. As Detective Inspector Tom Mallory leads the investigation, Kate begins to see puzzling parallels between the crimes and the local legend. The more she learns, the more convinced she becomes that the solution to both crimes lies in the murky depths of Anglo-Saxon history and a generations-old pattern of betrayal.

After spending more than nine months with my characters, I'm feeling disoriented. And not a little homesick.


For me, the closest real-life parallel is the feeling I had when my oldest son left on the school bus for his first day of kindergarten. I waved madly (and cried) as the bus lumbered down the street, turned left, and vanished. My precious little boy was on his own.

My book will have to make its way in the world, too. Of course, I plan to help it along as much as I can. But months of living, breathing, and dreaming about this story have come to an end.

A fourth book is in the works—one that must be planned, plotted, written, and polished. That will take time, and I'll fall in love with that story, too.

But first I need a few days to mourn the book I've left behind.

Have you ever felt homesick for a book you've read or written?

6 comments:

Margaret S. Hamilton said...

yes, all the time. I'm not invited to the party because it happened between books.

Susan said...

While we complain about the slowness of the publishing system, I suppose we should remember it also gives us time to live and connect with our characters. It’s a positive with a few side effects, as you’ve shown. Congrats on the finishing. I can’t wait to read it.

KM Rockwood said...

I have a number of books I go back & read every few years because I miss them.

E. B. Davis said...

No, but I know what it's like to see your kid off in the world. Even at age 30 and 33, they are still my babies!

Grace Topping said...

After finishing the lengthy book, "...And Ladies of the Club," I felt like I had moved away from a small town I loved. I felt a bit forlorn for awhile. I had spent so much time with the characters in that book, it was hard moving away from them.

Shari Randall said...

I find myself missing the characters from my Lobster Shack series and they keep wandering into my Ice Cream shop series! I totally understand. Congratulations on finishing your book, Connie. Your characters will be fine, I promise, and we'll all enjoy spending time with them when the book comes out.