If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


July Interviews













7/1 Lena Gregory, Scone Cold Killer
7/8 Jessica Baker, Murder on the Flying Scotsman
7/15 TG Wolff, Driving Reign
7/22 Leslie Budewitz, The Solace of Bay Leaves
7/29 Cynthia Kuhn, The Study of Secrets


Saturday Guest Bloggers

7/11 Mark Dressler
7/18 James McCrone

WWK Bloggers:

7/4 Valerie Burns
7/25 Kait Carson

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Susan Van Kirk's Three May Keep A Secret has been republished by Harlequinn's Worldwide Mystery. The WWK interview about the book can be accessed here. We're so glad another publisher picked up this series.


KM Rockwood's "Burning Desire," and Paula Gail Benson's "Living One's Own Truth," have been published in the anthology Heartbreaks & Half-truths. Congratulations to all of the WWK writers.


Please join Margaret S. Hamilton's Kings River Life podcast of her short story "Busted at the Book Sale" here. Congratulations, Margaret!


Look for Kaye George and Margaret S. Hamilton's short stories in the new Mid-Century Murder by Darkhouse Books. Kaye's story is "Life and Death on the Road" and Margaret's story is titled "4BR/3.5BA Contemporary."


Grace Topping's second novel in Laura Bishop staging series, Staging Wars, was released by Henery Press on April 28th. Look for the interview here from April 29th.


Kaye George's second novel in the Vintage Sweets mystery series, Deadly Sweet Tooth, was released on June 2. Look for the interview here on June 10.


Annette Dashofy's 10th Zoe Chambers mystery, Til Death, will be released on June 16th. Look for the interview here on June 17.


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Thursday, June 25, 2020

Homesick For A Village That Doesn't Exist by Connie Berry




I do so hate finishing books. I would like to go on with them forever. Beatrix Potter

Finishing books—and leaving the world you've created—is always a kind of emotionally wrenching experience. I usually cry. Lauren Oliver


Last week I turned in the manuscript for The Art of Betrayal, the third book in the Kate Hamilton Mystery series. It's not finished. Rounds of edits come next, but pushing send is a milestone marking the end of something cherished. Here's a glimpse:

American antiques dealer Kate Hamilton is spending the month of May in the Suffolk village of Long Barston, filling in at her friend Ivor Tweedy's antiquities shop while he recovers from bilateral hip surgery. Kate is thrilled when a local recluse consigns a valuable Chinese pottery jar from the ancient Han dynasty—until the jar goes missing and a body turns up in the middle of a village pageant celebrating an eleventh-century folktale. As Detective Inspector Tom Mallory leads the investigation, Kate begins to see puzzling parallels between the crimes and the local legend. The more she learns, the more convinced she becomes that the solution to both crimes lies in the murky depths of Anglo-Saxon history and a generations-old pattern of betrayal.

After spending more than nine months with my characters, I'm feeling disoriented. And not a little homesick.


For me, the closest real-life parallel is the feeling I had when my oldest son left on the school bus for his first day of kindergarten. I waved madly (and cried) as the bus lumbered down the street, turned left, and vanished. My precious little boy was on his own.

My book will have to make its way in the world, too. Of course, I plan to help it along as much as I can. But months of living, breathing, and dreaming about this story have come to an end.

A fourth book is in the works—one that must be planned, plotted, written, and polished. That will take time, and I'll fall in love with that story, too.

But first I need a few days to mourn the book I've left behind.

Have you ever felt homesick for a book you've read or written?

6 comments:

Margaret S. Hamilton said...

yes, all the time. I'm not invited to the party because it happened between books.

Susan said...

While we complain about the slowness of the publishing system, I suppose we should remember it also gives us time to live and connect with our characters. It’s a positive with a few side effects, as you’ve shown. Congrats on the finishing. I can’t wait to read it.

KM Rockwood said...

I have a number of books I go back & read every few years because I miss them.

E. B. Davis said...

No, but I know what it's like to see your kid off in the world. Even at age 30 and 33, they are still my babies!

Grace Topping said...

After finishing the lengthy book, "...And Ladies of the Club," I felt like I had moved away from a small town I loved. I felt a bit forlorn for awhile. I had spent so much time with the characters in that book, it was hard moving away from them.

Shari Randall said...

I find myself missing the characters from my Lobster Shack series and they keep wandering into my Ice Cream shop series! I totally understand. Congratulations on finishing your book, Connie. Your characters will be fine, I promise, and we'll all enjoy spending time with them when the book comes out.