If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


February Interviews

2/3 Jackie Layton, Bag of Bones
2/10 TG Wolff, Suicide Squeeze
2/17 Lida Sideris, Slightly Murderous Intent
2/24 Barbara Ross, Shucked Apart

Saturday WWK Bloggers

1/13 Jennifer J. Chow
2/20 E. B. Davis
2/27 Kait Carson

Guest Blogs

2/6 Polly Iyer













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Congratulations to Martha Reed. Her short story, "The Honor Thief" was chosen for the 2021 Bouchercon Anthology, This Time For Sure. Hank Phillippi Ryan will edit the volume, which will be released in August at the time of the convention.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Killer Weeds," appears in the January 20 edition of Texas Gardener's Seeds: From Our Garden to Yours. Congratulations, Margaret, who, if you follow Facebook know, is a superb gardener herself!

Congratulations to Jennifer J. Chow for garnering a 2021 Lefty Nomination for Best Humorous Mystery Novel. We're crossing our fingers for Jennifer!

Congratulations to Paula Gail Benson whose "Reputation or Soul" has been chosen for Malice Domestic 16: Mystery Most Diabolical anthology to be released this spring.

KM Rockwood's "Stay Safe--Very Safe" appears in this year's 2020 BOULD anthology. Congratulations, KM!

Margaret S. Hamilton's "Dealing at the Dump" appears in Cozy Villages of Death Fall 2020.

Margaret S. Hamilton's "Black Market Baby" and Debra H. Goldstein's "Forensic Magic" appear in Masthead: Best New England Crime Stories Fall 2020.

Jennifer J. Chow's Mimi Lee Reads Between the Lines (interview on WWK on 11/11) released on November 10.

Annette Dashofy signed with agent Dawn Dowdle of the Blue Ridge Literary Agency. Congratulations, Annette!

KM Rockwood's "Secrets To The Grave" has been published in the SinC Chesapeake Chapter's new anthology Invitation To Murder, released by Wildside Press on 10/6.

Susan Van Kirk's Three May Keep A Secret has been republished by Harlequin's Worldwide Mystery. The WWK interview about the book can be accessed here. We're so glad another publisher picked up this series.

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Friday, June 19, 2020

A Lesson in Top Down Economics by Warren Bull

A Lesson in Top Down Economics by Warren Bull





image from alamy (dot) com

During a recent (pre-COVID 19) trip to Savanah, Georgia, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, and Daufuskie Island, South Carolina I was reminded about how the economy really works. My wife and I got tickets labeled “Basic Economy,” which was a new designation to me. It meant we had the cheapest of all tickets. We were not given assigned seats ahead of time. We had to check-in at the gate to get whatever seats were left over from active service members (no complaint about that), the precious, semi-precious, and common metals groups of passengers (platinum, gold, silver, copper, lead and nickel, in descending order) and, economy fliers. I am not certain how many groups of economy there were. Perhaps enhanced economy and middle economy came before basic. Basic was a more polite word than scum. People in higher priced thrones are shielded from the view of those in lesser, smaller, and narrower chairs by a curtain. Passengers in those cushier, more flexible tush-holders with a greater capacity for reclining, have better food, quicker access to a bathroom and a smaller attendant to passenger ratio.
The outgoing flight was a redeye and being shoehorned into the last row, where the seats did not recline at all, was actually a good thing for a man, like me, of a certain age. I did not have to climb over people and maneuver through a dimly lit narrow aisle to get to the bathroom.
Savanah was a lovely city which had many antebellum structures. It was not burned during the Civil War. Partly that was because, unlike Atlanta, the Confederates did not set it afire before Sherman’s Union troops ever got there. Confederate forces abandoned Savanah completely, the city residents did not oppose the Union army but wisely invited the Yankees to make use of the finest homes.
Hilton Head Island was also a wonderful setting. My wife and I were even allowed to visits large parts of the island. True, we had to pay for the privilege of spending time in some of the places where we were not actively excluded. On the other hand, we were able to see some restricted beaches as we drove by in our car. Parking places, however, were denied anyone who did not own adjacent property or have a membership in a local beach club. We stayed in a gated timeshare that checked for our permit in the car window every time we entered it.
We met with friends and had a great time. I recommend visiting the area and learning about the Gullah culture. There is nothing unique about the status awarded to the wealthy. I could make similar observations in the cities I have lived in. I suppose I am usually oblivious to the advantages I have become accustomed to in my daily life.  Time in Georgia and South Carolina made me acutely aware of the way money influences American life.


1 comment:

Margaret S. Hamilton said...

I've visited Hilton Head for a soccer tournament, but other than the soccer complex and family-style restaurants near our motel on the beach, we didn't see much of the place.

When we lived in Atlanta, we made the trip to Savannah every year. I loved eating on the riverfront watching the boat traffic and touring the historic sites, including the homes of Juliette Gordon Low, Girl Scout founder.