If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Here are the upcoming WWK interviews for the month of June!

June 6 Maggie Toussaint, Confound It

June 13 Nicole J. Burton, Swimming Up the Sun

June 20 Julie Mulhern, Shadow Dancing

June 27 Abby L. Vandiver, Debut author, Secrets, Lies, & Crawfish Pies


Our June Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 6/2--Joanne Guidoccio, 6/9 Julie Mulhern, 6/16--Margaret S. Hamilton, 6/23--Kait Carson, and 6/30--Edith Maxwell.


Please welcome two new members to WWK--Annette Dashofy, who will blog on alternative Sundays with Jim Jackson, and Nancy Eady, who will blog on every fourth Monday. Thanks for blogging with us Annette and Nancy!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Annette Dashofy's Uneasy Prey was released in March. It is the sixth Zoe Chambers Mystery. The seventh, Cry Wolf, will be released on September 18th. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Annette on September 19th.

Carla Damron's quirky short story, "Subplot", was published in the Spring edition of The Offbeat Literary Journal. You can find it here: http://offbeat.msu.edu/volume-18-spring-2018/


Tina Whittle's sixth Tai Randolph mystery, Necessary Ends, debuts on April 3, 2018. Look for it here. Tina was nominated for a Derringer Award for her novelette, "Trouble Like A Freight Train Coming." We're all crossing our fingers for her.

James M. Jackson's Empty Promises, the next in the Seamus McCree mystery series (5th), was published on April 3, 2018. Purchase links are here. He's working on Seamus McCree #6 (False Bottom)


Dark Sister, a poetry collection, is Linda Rodriguez's tenth published book. It's available for sale here:


Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


Shari Randall's second Lobster Shack Mystery, Against the Claw, will be available in July 31, 2018.

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Friday, June 8, 2018

Taming Self-doubt by Warren Bull

image from pixabay

Doubter number one:Dame Judith Dench, winner of an Academy Award,six British Academy Film Awards, four BAFTA TV Awards, seven Olivier Awards, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, and a Tony Award, said that after she finishes an acting project she always worries that she will not be offered another role.

How can you counter self-doubt?
Recognize and challenge those inner critical voices.  You weren’t born doubting. Those voices are not the authentic you. They like to hide and sneak up on you when you are vulnerable. Tell them, “Oh, it’s you again. I know you and your lies.” Remind them, and yourself, of times when you’ve overcome tough circumstances. They will fade.

Beware of outside voices that tell you failure is on the way. Whether these people are misguidedly trying to keep you from getting hurt, projecting their fears onto you or just jealous that your success might challenge them to do better, they are not people you want to rely on. Doubts are contagious. Fortunately, confidence is equally contagious. You can find positive, successful people to hang out with.

Doubter number two: George Washington, before his inauguration, wrote to Supreme Court Chief Justice John Rutledge: “I greatly apprehend that my countrymen will expect too much from me. I fear, if the issue of public measures should not correspond with their sanguine expectations, they will turn the extravagant praises which they are heaping upon me at this moment into equally extravagant censures.”

More strategies to turn down the volume of critical inner voices:
Be kind to yourself. So many of us find it easier to be compassionate toward others than to ourselves. Imagine that someone else was in the situation you are criticizing yourself for. Would you be harsh toward that person? No. Then apply the same standards to you. When did you sign a contract that obligates you to being perfect?
Redefine failure
Failure is proof that we are actively pursuing something; not sitting around waiting passively for something to come to us. Failure provides feedback of what did not work and what did. Most likely what happened was a partial success. We can hang onto what worked and change what did not work. Some seeming failures are actually unexpected successes. Post-in notes came from repurposing an adhesive that did not hold nearly as well as intended. 


Doubter number three: Leonardo Da Vinci, also struggled with self-doubt. Known for the "Mona Lisa" and "The Last Supper," and other magnificent works of art,  Da Vinci was known during his lifetime for dithering and even abandoning projects. A line from one of his diaries read: "Tell me if I ever did a thing."

Ask. The truth will set you free…of crippling doubt

Ask yourself, “What’s the worst that could happen?” Realistically would failure begin a nuclear winter? Would you be blackballed from all further contact with another human being? If not, then it would be disappointing and possibly embarrassing. Yeah and so what? The image in your mind is much worse than the reality. 
Ask yourself, “What’s the best that could happen?” Keep your eyes on the prize. Focus on the goal and the little successes that will get you to the goal.

As the three doubting people mentioned above prove, self-doubt is very common. It does not predict failure. The only failure is not acting and even that failure is only temporary. The first step, through fear and doubt, however tiny, is a success. Fear and doubt will diminish. More success awaits.

9 comments:

Annette said...

Excellent piece, Warren. It's always a bit comforting to hear that some of the best of the best also face doubts and fear of failure.

Margaret Turkevich said...

Thanks, Warren. Good advice. I've progressed from "you really can't write and I'm wasting my time reading your submission" to "you should prioritize the romance to make your characters more believable, but watch out for purple prose."

And so it goes.

KM Rockwood said...

It's not easy to reprogram those voices in your head that tell you you don't measure up, especially when they are just repeating what you've been told as a kid by the people you desperately wanted to approve. But it can be done, and at some point you can rewrite your own script. And listen to it.

Mary Sutton said...

Great post. If all these great people had self-doubt and succeeded, how can I be any different?

Mary/Liz

Gloria Alden said...

Wonderful post, Warren. I find that as I age I try to ignore the doubts as much as possible. If some don't like what I write, oh well, we all have different ideas. If I'm not going to win any awards for my books, stories or poems, it doesn't matter. I'm writing because I love writing.

Jacqueline Seewald said...

Warren,

An excellent post. We writers accumulate many rejections that make us doubt our abilities. However, there is great satisfaction in knowing that we've done our very best and persisted.

M. K. Waller said...

Thanks for the validation and the encouragement. When I said I planned to submit a short story for publication, a friend said, "Start at the top." So I submitted it to a major magazine, where it's been for nine months and eight days. (I started counting days in month eight.) Some days, it's a masterpiece; some days, it's three levels below rotten. I'm just glad it was a masterpiece the day I sent it off. In P. D. James memoir, she say more than once (as I remember it), I didn't know whether I would write another book. Later she would say, Then I saw ABC and thought XYZ, and I knew I would write another book. If James doubted, I guess I'm in good company--as long as I don't let it linger.

E. B. Davis said...

These are wonderful examples, Warren. I have difficulty with self-doubt. This is one blog I'll keep and read now and again. Thank you.

Jim Jackson said...

Always a timely reminder to those of us who suffer from self-doubt.

In my experience those who never suffer from self-doubt -- should!