If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Here are the upcoming WWK interviews for the month of July!

July 4th Christopher Huang, A Gentleman's Murder

July 11th V. M. Burns, The Plot Is Murder

July 18th Edith Maxwell (Maddie Day), Death Over Easy

July 25th Shari Randall, Against The Claw


Our July Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 7/7--Mary Feliz, 7/14--Annie Hogsett, 7/21--Margaret S. Hamilton, 7/28--Kait Carson.

Our special bloggers for the fifth Monday and Tuesday of July--Kaye George and Paula Gail Benson.


Please welcome two new members to WWK--Annette Dashofy, who will blog on alternative Sundays with Jim Jackson, and Nancy Eady, who will blog on every fourth Monday. Thanks for blogging with us Annette and Nancy!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Annette Dashofy's Uneasy Prey was released in March. It is the sixth Zoe Chambers Mystery. The seventh, Cry Wolf, will be released on September 18th. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Annette on September 19th.

Carla Damron's quirky short story, "Subplot", was published in the Spring edition of The Offbeat Literary Journal. You can find it here: http://offbeat.msu.edu/volume-18-spring-2018/


Tina Whittle's sixth Tai Randolph mystery, Necessary Ends, debuts on April 3, 2018. Look for it here. Tina was nominated for a Derringer Award for her novelette, "Trouble Like A Freight Train Coming." We're all crossing our fingers for her.

James M. Jackson's Empty Promises, the next in the Seamus McCree mystery series (5th), was published on April 3, 2018. Purchase links are here. He's working on Seamus McCree #6 (False Bottom)


Dark Sister, a poetry collection, is Linda Rodriguez's tenth published book. It's available for sale here:


Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


Shari Randall's second Lobster Shack Mystery, Against the Claw, will be available in July 31, 2018.

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Friday, June 29, 2018

Tales of the Black Widowers by Isaac Asimov: A Review by Warren Bull

Tales of the Black Widowers by Isaac Asimov: A Review by Warren Bull



Image from Wikipedia
Isaac Asimov is most famous for his science fiction. He was  an amazingly prolific author. In his career Asimov also wrote about the Bible, Shakespeare, history and just about everything else imaginable. One of his many genres was mystery short stories.  This anthology is a collection of stories individually published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. It is the first of six anthologies containing sixty-six stories. Did I mention Asimov was a prolific writer? He was also a terrific writer. The set up is always the same. A group of middle-aged men calling themselves the Black Widowers meet for dinner once a month. The man who is host for a particular dinner invites a guest who invariably has a problem, which takes the form of a mystery.
The men’s attitude toward woman ranges from chauvinistic to misogynistic. Their banter gets old, but, to be fair each story was intended to be read individually.  The repetitiveness would be less apparent if they were read one at a time. There is a certain charm to the tales and Asimov’s inventiveness is apparent. After the intellectual and overblown speculations of the attendees, the mystery is always solved by their intrepid and completely honest waiter, Henry. He cuts through the clutter and gets to the heart of the matter every time.
I also enjoyed the author’s notes about each story, which include suggestions and comments from readers.  There are clever and memorable touches in the writing.
I recommend the book and suggest it may be best enjoyed by reading a story or two at a time. 

3 comments:

Kait said...

I had forgotten that Asimov wrote in Ellery Queen Magazine. I think that is where I first met him. I seem to remember clutching an old copy purloined from my brother's stash and pouring over the stories. Asimov's led me to hunt him down in our local library where I found, much to my delight, that all of his books were 4.5 x 6.5. The perfect size to slide in my then purse and very hand friendly. I read every one on the shelves-even though they were not mysteries, but sci-fi. I never did figure out why the books were all in that odd size, but they had great "hand."

Margaret Turkevich said...

Sounds like a plan! A great book to carry in the car.

KM Rockwood said...

I usually read a short story at bedtime. I'll have to think about adding this collection to my stack!