If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.











November Interview Schedule: 11/7 Lane Stone, 11/14 Maggie Toussaint, 11/21, Joana Garcia


Saturday Guest Bloggers: 11/3 Barbara Ross
WWK Satuday Bloggers: 11/10 Margaret S. Hamilton, 11/17 Kait Carson

Starting on Thanksgiving Day, 11/22, WWK presents original holiday offerings until New Year's Day. 11/22 Warren Bull, 11/29 Annette Dashofy, 12/6 KM Rockwood, 12/13 E. B. Davis, 12/20 Paula Gail Benson, & 12/27 Linda Rodriguez. We will resume our regular blogging schedule on 1/2/19. Please join us!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:


Grace Topping signed a three-book contract with Henery Press for her Laura Bishop Home Staging series. Congratulations, Grace!

KM Rockwood's new short story, "Map to Oblivion," has been included the anthology Shhhh...Murder! edited by Andrew MacRae and published by Darkhouse Books. It was released on Sept. 12.

Warren Bull also has a story in Shhh...Murder! Look for "Elsinore Noir," Warren's short story, in this anthology.

Annette Dashofy's Uneasy Prey was released in March. It is the sixth Zoe Chambers Mystery. The seventh, Cry Wolf, will be released on September 18th. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Annette on September 19th.

Shari Randall's third Lobster Shack Mystery, Drawn and Buttered, will be available February 26, 2019.

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Friday, June 29, 2018

Tales of the Black Widowers by Isaac Asimov: A Review by Warren Bull

Tales of the Black Widowers by Isaac Asimov: A Review by Warren Bull



Image from Wikipedia
Isaac Asimov is most famous for his science fiction. He was  an amazingly prolific author. In his career Asimov also wrote about the Bible, Shakespeare, history and just about everything else imaginable. One of his many genres was mystery short stories.  This anthology is a collection of stories individually published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. It is the first of six anthologies containing sixty-six stories. Did I mention Asimov was a prolific writer? He was also a terrific writer. The set up is always the same. A group of middle-aged men calling themselves the Black Widowers meet for dinner once a month. The man who is host for a particular dinner invites a guest who invariably has a problem, which takes the form of a mystery.
The men’s attitude toward woman ranges from chauvinistic to misogynistic. Their banter gets old, but, to be fair each story was intended to be read individually.  The repetitiveness would be less apparent if they were read one at a time. There is a certain charm to the tales and Asimov’s inventiveness is apparent. After the intellectual and overblown speculations of the attendees, the mystery is always solved by their intrepid and completely honest waiter, Henry. He cuts through the clutter and gets to the heart of the matter every time.
I also enjoyed the author’s notes about each story, which include suggestions and comments from readers.  There are clever and memorable touches in the writing.
I recommend the book and suggest it may be best enjoyed by reading a story or two at a time. 

3 comments:

Kait said...

I had forgotten that Asimov wrote in Ellery Queen Magazine. I think that is where I first met him. I seem to remember clutching an old copy purloined from my brother's stash and pouring over the stories. Asimov's led me to hunt him down in our local library where I found, much to my delight, that all of his books were 4.5 x 6.5. The perfect size to slide in my then purse and very hand friendly. I read every one on the shelves-even though they were not mysteries, but sci-fi. I never did figure out why the books were all in that odd size, but they had great "hand."

Margaret Turkevich said...

Sounds like a plan! A great book to carry in the car.

KM Rockwood said...

I usually read a short story at bedtime. I'll have to think about adding this collection to my stack!