If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


April Interviews













4/1 Jennifer Chow, Mimi Lee Gets A Clue
4/8 John Gaspard
4/15 Art Taylor, The Boy Detective & The Summer of '74
4/22 Maggie Toussaint, Seas the Day
4/29 Grace Topping, Staging Wars


Saturday Guest Bloggers
4/4 Sasscer Hill
4/18 Jackie Green


WWK Bloggers:
4/11 Paula Gail Benson
4/25 Kait Carson

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WWK is proud of our four Agatha nominees. Kaye George for Best Short Story--not her first time to be nominated, Connie Berry and Grace Topping for Best First Mystery Novel (wish they weren't having to compete against each other), and Annette Dashofy for Best Contemporary Novel--her fifth nomination!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Look for Kaye George and Margaret S. Hamilton's short stories in the new Mid-Century Murder by Darkhouse Books. Kaye's story is "Life and Death on the Road" and Margaret's story is titled "4BR/3.5BA Contemporary."


Kaye George's first novel in the Vintage Sweets mystery series, Revenge is Sweet, will be released on March 10th. Look for the interview here on March 11.


Grace Topping's second novel in Laura Bishop staging series, Staging Wars, will be released by Henery Press on April 28th. Look for the interview here on April 29th.


Don't miss Shari Randall's "The Queen of Christmas" available on at Amazon. Shari's holiday story for WWK was too long so she published it for our enjoyment. It's available for 99 cents or on Kindle Unlimited for free!


KM Rockwood's "The Society" and "To Die A Free Man; the Story of Joseph Bowers" are included in the BOULD Awards Anthology, which was released on November 19. KM won second place with a cash prize for "The Society." Congratulations, KM! Kaye George's "Meeting on the Funicular" is also in this anthology, which can be bought for 99 cents on Kindle until November 30.


Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

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Friday, October 6, 2017

The Cool Cottontail by John Ball: A Review by Warren Bull








The Cool Cottontail by John Ball: A Review by Warren Bull

John Ball was best known for his first novel, In The Heat of the Night, which won an Edgar Award for best first mystery novel in 1965 and was made into an Oscar-winning film. The Cool Cottontail continues the adventures of the author’s famous African-American police investigator, Virgil Tibbs.
This novel was written in 1966. The Cool Cottontail starts when a naked body is found in the swimming pool of a nudist park. Although the identity of the murdered man was hard to discover, leaving the body where the killer or killers did was bound to generate intense press coverage.
Virgil Tibbs was in the area. Chief Addis with the Pasadena Police Department approved his initial involvement and later allowed him to lead the investigation. The mystery was well written. The process of tracking down leads and continuing despite false starts felt realistic. In this novel, as in several others, the author showed his command of the genre and knowledge of the writing process. He involved sunbathing and a nudist camp, which added to my interest in the book.

Even more interesting to me was the author, who was apparently Caucasian, describing the thoughts and emotions of an African-American character. At that time the descriptive term was Negro. As far as I, as a Caucasian, can judge, Ball did an excellent job. With each new Caucasian person encountered, the investigator had to judge how he was being perceived as man of color and to respond in whatever manner made his gathering of information possible. Tibbs was very rarely entirely at ease either doing his job or in a social setting. 

In the interest of full disclosure, I should mention that I sometimes write about people of color, even as I recognize that I have never experienced the world as a person of color does.



5 comments:

Jim Jackson said...

Warren,
The title and story sounded familiar, so I checked my reading list. I read it in the summer of 1984. Since I usually don't remember titles I've read, this one must have made a positive impression.

~ Jim

Gloria Alden said...

Another book, Warren, to put on my TBR list. I have added an African American family to my
series, too, and have had a lot of positive comments about them, especially the nine year old twins, and the two elderly sisters who bicker. The parents are both professionals - a teacher and a lawyer.

Margaret S. Hamilton said...

Warren, it's familiar, so I must have read it. I'll order it up from the library and read it again.

Grace Topping said...

In order to have a diverse cast of characters, we writers have to write from the viewpoint of different races, creeds, and ethnic groups. Two of my characters are African-American. I didn't want to fall into the trap of using stereotypes, so I gave my draft to an African-American friend and asked her to review it. She suggested that I not immediately identify the ethnic group of a character but let it become evident as the story evolved.

KM Rockwood said...

I did not know that another book came after The Heat of the Night! It's definitely going on my TBR list.