If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


June Interviews

6/02 Terrie Moran, Murder She Wrote: Killing in a Koi Pond

6/09 Connie Berry, The Art of Betrayal

6/16 Kathleen Kalb, A Final Finale or A Fatal First Night

6/23 Jackie Layton, Bag of Bones: A Low Country Dog Walker Mystery

6/30 Mary Keliikoa, Denied


Saturday WWK Bloggers

6/12 Jennifer J. Chow

6/26 Kait Carson


Guest Blogs

6/05 Samantha Downing

6/19 Lynn Johanson













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E. B. Davis's "The Pearl Necklace" will appear in the new SinC Guppy anthology The Fish That Got Away to be released in July by Wildside Press. The anthology was edited by Linda Rodriguez. It will be released on June 21st.


Paula Gail Benson's monologue "Beloved Husband," from the perspective of Norton Baskin the second husband of Marjorie Kinan Rawlings (who wrote The Yearling and Cross Creek), appears in the Red Penguin Collection's An Empty Stage (released March 28, 2021).


Martha Reed's "Death by GPS" will appear in the Spring 2021 issue of Suspense Magazine, which will be released in the second week of April. Congratulations, Martha!


Susan Van Kirk has a new audiobook, A Death at Tippitt Pond, that will be released this month. Marry in Haste will be released in May by Harlequin Worldwide Mystery, as will Death Takes No Bribes in September. Congratulations, Susan.


Congratulations to Martha Reed. Her short story, "The Honor Thief" was chosen for the 2021 Bouchercon Anthology, This Time For Sure. Hank Phillippi Ryan will edit the volume, which will be released in August at the time of the convention.


Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Killer Weeds," appears in the January 20 edition of Texas Gardener's Seeds: From Our Garden to Yours. Congratulations, Margaret, who, if you follow Facebook know, is a superb gardener herself!


Congratulations to Paula Gail Benson whose "Reputation or Soul" has been chosen for Malice Domestic 16: Mystery Most Diabolical anthology to be released this spring.


KM Rockwood's "Stay Safe--Very Safe" appears in this year's 2020 BOULD anthology. Congratulations, KM!


Annette Dashofy signed with agent Dawn Dowdle of the Blue Ridge Literary Agency. Congratulations, Annette!

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Friday, October 6, 2017

The Cool Cottontail by John Ball: A Review by Warren Bull








The Cool Cottontail by John Ball: A Review by Warren Bull

John Ball was best known for his first novel, In The Heat of the Night, which won an Edgar Award for best first mystery novel in 1965 and was made into an Oscar-winning film. The Cool Cottontail continues the adventures of the author’s famous African-American police investigator, Virgil Tibbs.
This novel was written in 1966. The Cool Cottontail starts when a naked body is found in the swimming pool of a nudist park. Although the identity of the murdered man was hard to discover, leaving the body where the killer or killers did was bound to generate intense press coverage.
Virgil Tibbs was in the area. Chief Addis with the Pasadena Police Department approved his initial involvement and later allowed him to lead the investigation. The mystery was well written. The process of tracking down leads and continuing despite false starts felt realistic. In this novel, as in several others, the author showed his command of the genre and knowledge of the writing process. He involved sunbathing and a nudist camp, which added to my interest in the book.

Even more interesting to me was the author, who was apparently Caucasian, describing the thoughts and emotions of an African-American character. At that time the descriptive term was Negro. As far as I, as a Caucasian, can judge, Ball did an excellent job. With each new Caucasian person encountered, the investigator had to judge how he was being perceived as man of color and to respond in whatever manner made his gathering of information possible. Tibbs was very rarely entirely at ease either doing his job or in a social setting. 

In the interest of full disclosure, I should mention that I sometimes write about people of color, even as I recognize that I have never experienced the world as a person of color does.



5 comments:

Jim Jackson said...

Warren,
The title and story sounded familiar, so I checked my reading list. I read it in the summer of 1984. Since I usually don't remember titles I've read, this one must have made a positive impression.

~ Jim

Gloria Alden said...

Another book, Warren, to put on my TBR list. I have added an African American family to my
series, too, and have had a lot of positive comments about them, especially the nine year old twins, and the two elderly sisters who bicker. The parents are both professionals - a teacher and a lawyer.

Margaret S. Hamilton said...

Warren, it's familiar, so I must have read it. I'll order it up from the library and read it again.

Grace Topping said...

In order to have a diverse cast of characters, we writers have to write from the viewpoint of different races, creeds, and ethnic groups. Two of my characters are African-American. I didn't want to fall into the trap of using stereotypes, so I gave my draft to an African-American friend and asked her to review it. She suggested that I not immediately identify the ethnic group of a character but let it become evident as the story evolved.

KM Rockwood said...

I did not know that another book came after The Heat of the Night! It's definitely going on my TBR list.