If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Our reason for creating WWK originated as an outlet for our love of reading and writing mystery fiction. We hope you love it, too, and will enjoy our holiday gifts to our readers with original short stories to celebrate the season. Starting on 11/16 stories by Warren Bull, Margaret S. Hamilton, Paula Gail Benson, Linda Rodriguez, KM Rockwood, Gloria Alden, and E. B. Davis will appear every Thursday into the New Year.


Our November Author Interviews: 11/8--Ellen Byron, and 11/15--Sujata Massey. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


November Saturday Bloggers: 11/4 Margaret S. Hamilton and 11/11 Cheryl Hollon.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," just published, will appear in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.


James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, June 10, 2016

Nothing Can Rescue Me by Elizabeth Daly: A review by Warren Bull


Nothing Can Rescue Me by Elizabeth Daly: A review by Warren Bull

Nothing Can Rescue Me was published in 1943. Elizabeth Daly was a prolific and popular author during the Golden Age of mystery writing. Her detective, Henry Gamadge, was called, “The American Peter Wimsey.” Agatha Christie was one of her biggest fans. The author considered the mystery novel at its best to be a high form of literature. She did not start writing mysteries until she was past sixty.

It will come as no surprise that the novel takes place in an elegant country estate where a collection of family members, friends and servants gather around a wealthy matriarch. Unlike many novels of the time, the setting is America. Gamadge is called to investigate when a series of ominous messages appear typed into the manuscript of a novel Florence Hutter is writing. One guest fears evil spirits were unleashed unknowingly by the Grande Dame, herself, when she used an Ouija board.
There is a maturity and well-honed ease in the writing. The basic plot avoids becoming yet another cliché by the craft of the writer. It is written for an educated audience. I had to look up three terms in the dictionary. In fact, in another book by this author I was unable to find the meaning of two phrases she used. A comparison with Agatha Christie is not unreasonable.

I enjoyed the book. I recommend it, but not as highly as books written by the Christie or, for that matter, Sayers. If the author lacks the genius of those two, what author does not?

6 comments:

KB Inglee said...

She sounds like an author worth looking up. I love the classic mysteries the way some people love old films. Thanks for the tip.

Margaret Turkevich said...

I'll keep Daly in mind. Sayers has always been my favorite, especially The Nine Tailors.

E. B. Davis said...

I love Sayers, too, Margaret. Have to admit, though, I'm intrigued by an American locked-door mystery.

Kait said...

Very intriguing, especially the US setting!

Gloria Alden said...


Sounds like another good one to read, Warren. Especially since I love Dorothy Sayers.

KM Rockwood said...

An author I don't know that I've encounter. Like everyone else, I'll have to look her up and see what I can find.