If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.













July Interview Schedule:
7/3 Jean Stone A Vineyard Summer
7/10 Mark Bergin
7/17 Christin Brecher Murder's No Votive Confidence
7/24 Dianne Freeman A Ladies' Guide to Gossip
7/31 J. C. Kenney A Genuine Fix

Saturday Guest Bloggers: 7/6 V. M. Burns, 7/13 Joe Amiel,

WWK Satuday Bloggers: 7/20 Gloria Alden, 7/27 Kait Carson

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Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:


Susan Van Kirk's A Death At Tippett Pond was released on June 15th. Read E. B. Davis's interview with Susan.


KM Rockwood's "Frozen Daiquiris" appears in The Best Laid Plans: 21 Stories of Mystery & Suspense, edited by Judy Penz Sheluk. The anthology will be released on June 18th.

Congratulations to Margaret S. Hamilton for being a finalist in the Daphne Du Maurier contest. Margaret competes in the Unpublished/Mainstream mystery/suspense category.

Congratulations to Shari Randall for WINNING the Agatha Award for Best First Novel. Her book, Curses, Boiled Again was published by St. Martin's last year. Read the interview about the book here. Yay, Shari!

Fishy Business anthology authors include KM Rockwood, Debra Goldstein, and James M. Jackson. This volume was edited by Linda Rodriguez.

Please read Margaret S. Hamilton and Debra Goldstein's short stories (don't ask about their modus operandi) in a new anthology, Cooked To Death Vol. IV: Cold Cut Files

Warren Bull's Abraham Lincoln: Seldom Told Stories was released. It is available at: GoRead: https://www.goread.com/book/abraham-lincoln-seldom-told-stories or at Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/ydaklx8p

Grace Topping's mystery, Staging is Murder was released April 30.

James M. Jackson extends the Seamus McCree series with the May 25th publication of #6, False Bottom.

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Tuesday, April 17, 2012

My Anti-Bucket List

When I was willing to admit that I was old, rather than just late middle aged, I began a list of things I would never have to do again. Or never do at all.

I will never have to fly again. I don't like flying, but I was willing to put up with it to get to places I needed or wanted to be. It's hard to get from Boston to Ireland in a reasonable time any other way. But trains serve my needs these days. I love train travel.

I will never go skiing. While I like snow and cold, skiing has always struck me as something you either did a lot or not at all. It is a skill that has to be practiced. I could not master it in a day a year. I didn't want to devote the time to get good at it. Of course, people enjoy a day on the slopes, just not me.

I will never have to teach another tiny kid to ride a horse. Most kids aren’t natural riders and they are too young to understand instructions like "lower your inside hand". Once they figure it out what you want, they excel at it. Adults can understand the instructions; they just can't get their bodies to do it. I loved my years of teaching, being one of the few willing to do the first eight weeks when kid meets horse. I believed that those eight weeks were the important foundation for the rest of their riding lives. And I loved it. But I am glad I don't have to do it anymore.

Oh¸ yeah, then there is the hot air balloon ride I will never have to take.

I won't have to hunt for a job. Or sing in a choir.

I am beginning to believe I won't have to garden again. I'm not really convinced of that. I bought a couple of hundred bulbs and never got them into the ground. I may never. Right now I am contemplating tomatoes and peppers, and planting the seeds I bought. I may keep contemplating until it is too late to act.

I haven't been much of a success at this anti-bucket list. At 70 I said I would never climb over another spit rail fence. The thing about split rail fences is that they have no gates¸ so to get into the pasture, one either climbs over or disassembles them.

This may seem like a pretty grim list, keeping track of the things that are lost. In fact, it is liberating. It clears time and energy to do the things I really love. It keeps me day dreaming and setting goals.

There are still some things on my more traditional bucket list, things I haven't done that I want to do. There are some writing conferences I would like to attend, even if I have to fly to them.

I'd love to have one of my novels published. As much as I like short stories and consider myself a short story writer, I have written my share of novels and it would be great to see one in print.

I would like to see a night sky full of stars. I live in a high sky glow area and we have four or five stars that shine through.

I would like to teach more. I love doing the one hour seminars in some writing subject. In September I am doing one on how to take criticism. I would like to teach a course on writing historical stories to high school kids.

Oh, yes there are piles of things I haven't done yet, and still wish to do. Some I will mange to fit in, others are gone for good.

3 comments:

Linda Rodriguez said...

This is an excellent idea, KB. I think I'll start an anti-bucket list of my own. There's real freedom in knowing that you'll never do this or that again.

Warren Bull said...

My wife and I did this when she retired. She had a list of meetings she would never have to go to again, classes she would not have to schedule and unresponsive students she would not have to nag. She is still involved with projects she is interested in. I am about to cancel my plan for a career in the National Basketball League since I cannot shoot, rebound, block shots, pass, dribble or run quickly. I will never have to fill out a health care provider form or keep track of continuing education.

Gloria Alden said...

I love your anti-bucket list, KB. I just cut the last contact for substitute teaching. I felt a little saddened by that because I enjoy the kids, but it is so freeing knowing I won't have to answer that 6:00 a.m. call and go anywhere. I feel the same way when I'm anywhere and see mobs of kids with teachers and parent chaperones - not with nostalgia, but relief that I never have to herd a bunch of active third graders anymore.

Warren, I am so impressed. Another skill I didn't know you possessed.

Yeah, getting older does have some really good benefits - senior discounts among them.