If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


February Interviews













2/5 Heather Weidner, Glitter, Glam, and Contraband
2/12 Rhys Bowen, Above The Bay of Angels
2/19 Elizabeth Penney, Hems & Homicide
2/26 Annette Dashofy, Under The Radar


Saturday Guest Bloggers:
2/1 Valerie Burns
2/8 Jeannette de Beauvoir
2/15 Kathryn Lane

WWK Bloggers: 2/22 Kait Carson, 1/28 & 1/29 Special Interviews with Agatha Nominees by Paula Gail Benson

*************************************************************************

WWK is proud of our four Agatha nominees. Kaye George for Best Short Story--not her first time to be nominated, Connie Berry and Grace Topping for Best First Mystery Novel (wish they weren't having to compete against each other), and Annette Dashofy for Best Contemporary Novel--her fifth nomination!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Look for Kaye George and Margaret S. Hamilton's short stories in the new Mid-Century Murder by Darkhouse Books. Kaye's story is "Life and Death on the Road" and Margaret's story is titled "4BR/3.5BA Contemporary."


Kaye George's first novel in the Vintage Sweets mystery series, Revenge is Sweet, will be released on March 10th. Look for the interview here on March 11.


Grace Topping's second novel in Laura Bishop staging series, Staging Wars, will be released by Henery Press on April 28th. Look for the interview here on April 29th.


Don't miss Shari Randall's "The Queen of Christmas" available on at Amazon. Shari's holiday story for WWK was too long so she published it for our enjoyment. It's available for 99 cents or on Kindle Unlimited for free!


KM Rockwood's "The Society" and "To Die A Free Man; the Story of Joseph Bowers" are included in the BOULD Awards Anthology, which was released on November 19. KM won second place with a cash prize for "The Society." Congratulations, KM! Kaye George's "Meeting on the Funicular" is also in this anthology, which can be bought for 99 cents on Kindle until November 30.


Paula Gail Benson's story "Wisest, Swiftest, Kindest" appears in Love in the Lowcountry an anthology by the Lowcountry Romance Writers available 11/5 in e-book and print format on Amazon. The anthology includes fourteen stories all based in Charleston, South Carolina.


Kaye George's "Grist for the Mill" was published in A Murder of Crows anthology, edited by Sandra Murphy on October 9th.



Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

Susan Van Kirk's A Death At Tippett Pond was released on June 15th. Read E. B. Davis's interview with Susan.

Warren Bull's Abraham Lincoln: Seldom Told Stories was released. It is available at: GoRead: https://www.goread.com/book/abraham-lincoln-seldom-told-stories or at Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/ydaklx8p

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thursday, October 6, 2011

The Tiger Within

I could often have been called a workaholic. Work always enriched my life. Therefore, I can certainly understand writing coaches who urge, “Put ass to chair and write every day even if it looks like garbage.”

Writers have favorite pens. Some create on computers. Others must write in longhand first. I’ve known writers who go on retreats to work among monks with vows of silence. There are writers who need deadlines and other writers who never meet these deadlines.

Do any of these approaches make sitting down every day to write easier? Maybe if you have the true Puritan ethic as it existed when Puritanism first came into being. Suffering and self-denial used to be very good things. When caught up in a story and the characters a writer might rush to sit down every day but the magic doesn’t last forever.

I found a burst of creativity and willingness to write every day after I moved my computer because I thought the wall connection might be causing my internet connection to fail. I was wrong but I received secondary gains. Writing came more easily in the new spot. I was further inspired after I stopped trying to understand characters I’d been working on and decided they were at best crazy and at worst in a state of arrested development. I latched onto characters I like.

On the wall, close to my computer’s new position is the first picture I bought in America. It’s a tiger that fills the canvas. When I bought it, the tiger was bright orange and yellow and carved out of the background with bold black strokes. I wanted the tiger for its free lens9078161_1265116439tiger-sittingspirit and ferocity.

The colors have faded. The tiger blends more naturally into the sandy background. The orange has a pink tinge like flushed skin. The animal isn’t mellow or friendly. It sits, enormous front paws at rest, looking out and inward at the same time.

How can a canvas change so much? I must see what I want to see, you might say. I know about Rorschach and all the strange images and pornography that can be seen in innocent ink-blots. But it’s not just my eyes that alter the picture’s mood. The canvas has absorbed more of the colors that have been bleached by sunshine. I think the change is good like the new position of my computer.

Do you have strategies to jump start the creative juices?

3 comments:

Warren Bull said...

My muse has a way of turning on when I'm trying to turn my mind off and go to sleep.

E. B. Davis said...

I'm a workaholic too, Pauline. Problem is, I work at everything, around the house, on the blog, interviewing, writing shorts and my WIP. My fractured time is frustrating. Sitting down to write is a problem, but not half the problem of thinking time.

The discussion of pantsers vs. plotters seems silly to me because I employ both methods. After I plot, when I put word to the page, then, within my plotted framework, I become the pantser.

It's having time, time alone without competing tasks that defeats me.

Pauline Alldred said...

I think being in the dark and when it's quieter turns up the imagination, Warren. My own inner critic wakes me up in the middle of the night sometimes.

There's always something is such a true statement in my life, Elaine. And I guess I should be grateful for that because, when the statement is no longer true, it won't be finding time to write that preoccupies my mind.