If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.














September Interviews
9/4 Liz Milliron, Heaven Has No Rage
9/11 Marilyn Levinson/Allison Brook, Buried In The Stacks
9/18 Ellen Byron, Fatal Cajun Festival
9/25 Maggie Toussaint, Dreamed It

Saturday Guest Bloggers: 9/14 Debbie De Louise

WWK Bloggers: 9/7 Valerie Burns, 9/28 Kait Carson

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Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:


Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

Susan Van Kirk's A Death At Tippett Pond was released on June 15th. Read E. B. Davis's interview with Susan.


KM Rockwood's "Frozen Daiquiris" appears in The Best Laid Plans: 21 Stories of Mystery & Suspense, edited by Judy Penz Sheluk. The anthology will be released on June 18th.

Congratulations to Margaret S. Hamilton for being a finalist in the Daphne Du Maurier contest. Margaret competes in the Unpublished/Mainstream mystery/suspense category.

Congratulations to Shari Randall for WINNING the Agatha Award for Best First Novel. Her book, Curses, Boiled Again was published by St. Martin's last year. Read the interview about the book here. Yay, Shari!

Fishy Business anthology authors include KM Rockwood, Debra Goldstein, and James M. Jackson. This volume was edited by Linda Rodriguez.

Please read Margaret S. Hamilton and Debra Goldstein's short stories (don't ask about their modus operandi) in a new anthology, Cooked To Death Vol. IV: Cold Cut Files

Warren Bull's Abraham Lincoln: Seldom Told Stories was released. It is available at: GoRead: https://www.goread.com/book/abraham-lincoln-seldom-told-stories or at Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/ydaklx8p

Grace Topping's mystery, Staging is Murder was released April 30.

James M. Jackson extends the Seamus McCree series with the May 25th publication of #6, False Bottom.

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Thursday, October 27, 2011

Death of a WIP

When should I decide to discard the WIP that consumed so much time and energy, that kept me awake and woke me up, and that gave me a humongous carbon footprint? The hours I invested in imaginary people and settings I could have spent socializing, doing volunteer grim-reaper-scythe-1work, or improving my professional skills with continuing education courses.

Do I place a paper copy of the story in a bottom drawer or trust in an electronic device and leave a copy on my Passport, an external hard drive? Sometimes pieces of characters, events, and dialogue can be revitalized and transformed in a new work.

What is making me put my WIP to death or at the very least into a coma—200 rejections, 300 rejections? How soon before I read a story about a writer whose career took off after her 304th rejection? Am I no longer interested in the characters and plot? Perhaps I don’t believe the story deserves more time and effort.

I can tell myself I learn from any writing I labor over. I might have even learned what I was doing wrong. Whatever I tell myself, I still have to say goodbye to hours of enthusiastic creativity, soul-searching, and stretching the mind.

Before progressing too far into my present project, I reread Robert McKee’s Story. While reading the first half of the book, I was inspired. During my reading of the second half, I plunged into despair, certain I could never create a worthwhile story.

I plan to outline with scenes—40 to 60 of them for a start. What’s the point of having great turning points, climaxes, and resolutions if the scenes in between don’t work?

Besides my decision to focus on scenes, I also learned from McKee’s book why some stories I read, rich in detail and well-grounded, don’t hold my interest. Characterization is not character. No matter what hobbies, possessions, or fascinating careers are attached to characters, true character is revealed when a character makes a decision under pressure, often choosing the lesser of two evils.

Once again, I’m involved in a WIP, passing up opportunities to do good works and finish raking the leaves. I think writers will be confined after death in a Dante-like circle of hell where they’re provided with computers with programs that don’t work and critique partners whose sole interest is destroying the competition.

2 comments:

Warren Bull said...

I didn't count the rejections of my first novel. It would have been too distressing. It was nine years from concept to publication. For other writers it took even more time. I abandoned the work several times. Later i would regain interest and pick it up again. You can build your resume and editors/agents will take you more seriously if you have short stories, articles etc.

You might let the book sit for a while. You might also look for a critique group that pushes you to write better
without jumping on you when you do.

Good luck!

Pauline Alldred said...

Thanks, Warren. Sometimes I think a writer just becomes tired of the same character that he/she has worked on for years.