If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Our reason for creating WWK originated as an outlet for our love of reading and writing mystery fiction. We hope you love it, too, and will enjoy our holiday gifts to our readers with original short stories to celebrate the season. Starting on 11/16 stories by Warren Bull, Margaret S. Hamilton, Paula Gail Benson, Linda Rodriguez, KM Rockwood, Gloria Alden, and E. B. Davis will appear every Thursday into the New Year.


Our November Author Interviews: 11/8--Ellen Byron, and 11/15--Sujata Massey. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


November Saturday Bloggers: 11/4 Margaret S. Hamilton and 11/11 Cheryl Hollon.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," just published, will appear in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.


James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, April 28, 2017

Indian Killer by Sherman Alexie: A Review by Warren Bull







Indian Killer by Sherman Alexie: A Review by Warren Bull

Image from Precut dot com

Alexie uses the form of a mystery/thriller to write about the issues of identity and racism. A serial murderer in Seattle terrorizes the city by hunting and killing white people. The crimes set off waves of hatred and violence directed at Native Americans.

The characters in the book include John Smith, a Native American raised by white parents who knows very little about his heritage, Jack Wilson, an ex-cop and novelist who wants so much to be Native American that he imagines a heritage in the group, Dr. Clarence Mather who teaches classes about Native Americans and thinks he knows more about them than his Native American students.

Also present are Truck Smith, a radio show host who vents bigoted rants against Native Americans that keep adding pressure to the community and Marie Polatkin, a Native American activist who struggles against the prejudices and ignorance of those in power.

Alexie writes clearly and vigorously giving readers a grim, realistic picture of being a minority in a predominately white society. He shows how racism and ignorance affect both majority and minority people.


That this book is written like a mystery is not important. What matters is what Alexie writes about. For a greater understanding of what Native Americans face in our society, I recommend this highly.

4 comments:

KM Rockwood said...

I haven't read this one, but I'm familiar with Sherman Alexie's work. I enjoy his perspective, and find it make me look at things from a different angle.

I'm going to have too look this one up.

Margaret Turkevich said...

another one for my "Warren" list.

Shari Randall said...

One of my favorite authors. Thanks for sharing, Warren.

cacuoc88vn said...

Your book reviews are really good and help me to choose the books of even less known writers who have done a really good work. Thanks for sharing.