If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Our reason for creating WWK originated as an outlet for our love of reading and writing mystery fiction. We hope you love it, too, and will enjoy our holiday gifts to our readers with original short stories to celebrate the season. Starting on 11/16 stories by Warren Bull, Margaret S. Hamilton, Paula Gail Benson, Linda Rodriguez, KM Rockwood, Gloria Alden, and E. B. Davis will appear every Thursday into the New Year.


Our November Author Interviews: 11/8--Ellen Byron, and 11/15--Sujata Massey. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


November Saturday Bloggers: 11/4 Margaret S. Hamilton and 11/11 Cheryl Hollon.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," just published, will appear in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.


James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Monday, April 10, 2017

National Library Week 2017



By Shari Randall

Whoo hoo! It’s National Library Week. I hope there’s cake in the break room for librarians across the country. Or maybe a raise. 

The American Library Association sponsored the first National Library Week in 1958. All kinds of libraries celebrate – public, academic, special, and school. It’s a time to celebrate the ways these libraries contribute to their communities, to publicize their offerings, and to promote library support. This year’s theme is “Libraries Transform.”

If you’d like to join the celebration, the ALA has designated these special events for the week. Here’s the calendar from their website:

Monday, April 10: State of America's Libraries Report released, including Top Ten Frequently Challenged Books of 2016.

Tuesday, April 11: National Library Workers Day, a day for library staff, users, administrators and Friends groups to recognize the valuable contributions made by all library workers.

Wednesday, April 12: National Bookmobile Day, a day to recognize the contributions of our nation's bookmobiles and the dedicated professionals who make quality bookmobile outreach possible in their communities.

Thursday, April 13, has just been designated TakeAction for Libraries Day.

If you have been following the news you know that the President had proposed eliminating all federal library program funding and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) that administers it. There was an outcry from library supporters across the country and a push to have to their representatives sign “Dear Appropriators” letters to preserve funding.

Library supporters rejoice! One-third of the House of Representatives (of both parties) signed these “Dear Appropriators” letters. The ALA created this House tracker to see if your Representative in the House signed on to support one of the two programs that fund IMLS, IAL (Innovative Approaches to Literacy Act) and LSTA (Library Services and Technology Act).

Next the ALA is working on Senate Dear Appropriator letters for LSTA and IAL. This Senate tracker will show if your Senator signed last year. 

What a year for libraries. It’s not all banned books, maker spaces, and best sellers. Now librarians can add advocacy to their to-do lists.

Be sure to stop by your library and let the librarians know you appreciate them. Just don’t ask them to do your taxes. Librarians really don’t like that.

12 comments:

Margaret Turkevich said...

Several years ago our local rep saved library funding during Ohio budget cuts. I'll start sending messages to our congressman. Our local library is the hub of the community and offers free holds from the local Cincinnati/Hamilton County system and Ohio colleges and universities.

Art Taylor said...

Great post! Didn't know it was National Library Week, so this is both newsworthy and fun to read. :-)

Shari Randall said...

Hi Margaret,
Yes, write those letters! I've been heartened by the responses I've received from elected officials. We just have to keep libraries on their radar. Keep fighting the good fight!

Shari Randall said...

Hi Art,
Thank you for stopping by. I hope you and Dash plan a celebratory visit to Burke Center. You'll probably hear that FCPL's hours may be on the budget chopping block. It never ends. Looking forward to seeing you at Malice!

Warren Bull said...

I volunteer at my local library, which is a great resource.

Gloria Alden said...

I donate books to the library for their annual sales, and I donate my own books, too. I visit two local libraries often, and I will send letters.

Kait said...

Who doesn't love libraries? How could anyone consider defunding them? URGH!!!!! As a child, I believed all the magic and knowledge in the world was concentrated in libraries. I've never lost the feeling.

KM Rockwood said...

Libraries are important! Only those who can easily afford to buy all the books they want (and possibly those who can't read!) could be for cutting library funding.

Shari Randall said...

Hi Warren, Gloria, Kait, and KM - I love the library passion! I wish more people were like you, and truly supported their libraries.

Shari Randall said...

And Kait - sadly, there are a ton of politicians out there who, evidently, didn't get the library magic when they were young. I can't tell you how many times I've heard "but everything is on the internet" (totally ignoring the people who don't have access) and "everyone should just buy their own books (tell that to a mom who has to decide between food and books for her kids).

Grace Topping said...

This stupid move to cut funding for libraries is coming from the same people who want to cut funding for PBS. Sadly, the dumbing of America continues. Contribute to your local library and your local public radio station. If you don't, it may not be there for the next generation.

Shari Randall said...

Yeah, Grace!