If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


July Interviews













7/1 Lena Gregory, Scone Cold Killer
7/8 Jessica Baker, Murder on the Flying Scotsman
7/15 TG Wolff, Driving Reign
7/22 Leslie Budewitz, The Solace of Bay Leaves
7/29 Cynthia Kuhn, The Study of Secrets


Saturday Guest Bloggers

7/11 Mark Dressler
7/18 James McCrone

WWK Bloggers:

7/4 Valerie Burns
7/25 Kait Carson

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Congratulations to our two Silver Falchion Finalists Connie Berry and Debra Goldstein!


Paula Gail Benson's "Cosway's Confidence" placed second and Debra Goldstein's "Wabbit's Carat" received Honorable Mention in the Bethlehem Writers Roundtable 2020 short story contest. Congratulations, Paula and Debra!


Susan Van Kirk's Three May Keep A Secret has been republished by Harlequinn's Worldwide Mystery. The WWK interview about the book can be accessed here. We're so glad another publisher picked up this series.


KM Rockwood's "Burning Desire," and Paula Gail Benson's "Living One's Own Truth," have been published in the anthology Heartbreaks & Half-truths. Congratulations to all of the WWK writers.


Please join Margaret S. Hamilton's Kings River Life podcast of her short story "Busted at the Book Sale" here. Congratulations, Margaret!


Look Margaret S. Hamilton's short stories in the new Mid-Century Murder by Darkhouse Books. Margaret's story is titled "4BR/3.5BA Contemporary."


Grace Topping's second novel in Laura Bishop staging series, Staging Wars, was released by Henery Press on April 28th. Look for the interview here from April 29th.


Annette Dashofy's 10th Zoe Chambers mystery, Til Death, will be released on June 16th. Look for the interview here on June 17.


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Friday, April 21, 2017

World Book Day



Image from coffeecupsandcrayons (dot) com

Reading changes lives
World Book Day - Sunday April 23, is all about celebrating reading and books.
Reading paves the way for intellectual and emotional growth throughout our lives. Studies show that there are many benefits to reading — from helping us overcome stress to keeping our brains sharp.
Books nurture our imaginations and our empathy, take us places we've never been, and introduce us to ideas and people we might never have otherwise encountered. Literacy skills can help empower people, positively impact communities and enrich lives.
Happy World Book Day!

Join us in supporting literacy
The charities below work to provide books and reading resources at home and around the world.
Worldreader - their mission is to create a world where everyone is a reader.
Room to Read - a focus on improving literacy and gender equality in education in the developing world.
First Book - provides new books, learning material and other essentials to children in need.


Amazon dot com is also donating and accepting donations.

5 comments:

Jacqueline Seewald said...

Warren,

Thanks for providing this info!

Gloria Alden said...

I can't imagine a life without reading books. I always have at least two books going; one by my nesting chair downstairs and one beside my bed. Although I buy a lot of books, I also get a lot of them from two local libraries. I belong to two book clubs, and I almost always get the books for them from the libraries. I also donate books to their library book sales.

KM Rockwood said...

While we're on the subject, please remember that Trump's new budget completely eliminates funding for museums and libraries. If you support access to libraries for all people in our communities, please consider contacting your congress members to let them know that you support libraries, and please support keeping these fairly minimal funds in the budget.

E. B. Davis said...

We need our libraries so everyone has access to information. Without libraries, we lose an essential part of our freedom--the right to information, which increases the mentality and education of our population. Without libraries, we'd be a nation of "reality," soaps, and melodrama TV or violent movies. That isn't where our heads should be.

Shari Randall said...

Thank you, Warren, for shining a light on these great groups specifically and on the wider issue of literacy. People, and especially politicians, don't grasp the huge problem of illiteracy and low-literacy in our country. I had a professor who said if you wanted to bring down incarceration rates, bring up literacy rates. A huge percentage of those in prison have low literacy or are illiterate. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that people who can't read don't have great options in life.