If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.














January Interviews
1/1 Sherry Harris, Sell Low, Sweet Harriet
1/8 Barbara Ross, Sealed Off
1/15 Libby Klein, Theater Nights Are Murder
1/22 Carol Pouliot, Doorway To Murder
1/29 Julia Buckley, Death with A Dark Red Rose

Saturday Guest Bloggers:
1/4 Lisa Lieberman
1/11 Karen McCarthy
1/18 Trey Baker

WWK Bloggers: 1/25 Kait Carson, 1/30 E. B. Davis

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Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Don't miss Shari Randall's "The Queen of Christmas" available on at Amazon. Shari's holiday story for WWK was too long so she published it for our enjoyment. It's available for 99 cents or on Kindle Unlimited for free!


KM Rockwood's "The Society" and "To Die A Free Man; the Story of Joseph Bowers" are included in the BOULD Awards Anthology, which was released on November 19. KM won second place with a cash prize for "The Society." Congratulations, KM! Kaye George's "Meeting on the Funicular" is also in this anthology, which can be bought for 99 cents on Kindle until November 30.


Paula Gail Benson's story "Wisest, Swiftest, Kindest" appears in Love in the Lowcountry an anthology by the Lowcountry Romance Writers available 11/5 in e-book and print format on Amazon. The anthology includes fourteen stories all based in Charleston, South Carolina.


Kaye George's "Grist for the Mill" was published in A Murder of Crows anthology, edited by Sandra Murphy on October 9th.


Lyrical Press will publish Kaye George's Vintage Sweets mystery series. The first book, Revenge Is Sweet, will be released in March. Look for the interview here on 3/11.

Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

Susan Van Kirk's A Death At Tippett Pond was released on June 15th. Read E. B. Davis's interview with Susan.

Warren Bull's Abraham Lincoln: Seldom Told Stories was released. It is available at: GoRead: https://www.goread.com/book/abraham-lincoln-seldom-told-stories or at Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/ydaklx8p

Grace Topping's mystery, Staging is Murder was released April 30. It is now also available in audio.

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Friday, February 26, 2016

Reviews of The Hollow Needle and The Profiteers



THE HOLLOW NEEDLE by Maurice Leblanc
A Review by Warren Bull

      Originally published in 1911, The Hollow Needle is one in a series of work about the criminal mastermind Arsene Lupin. Lupin’s daring exploits, clever escapes, extraordinary physical abilities and ability to outwit the police make him larger than life. He is a character like d’Artagnan.  Reading requires a greater suspension of disbelief than most novels.  The heroic Lupin interrupts the action from time to time to make florid speeches about his own brilliance. 
Lupin does not appear for about the first third of the book.  One chapter was written in the first person while all others were written in the third person.  I noticed that every false message sent tricked whoever received it.  Every disguise was successful.  An English detective named Holmlock Shears put in an appearance.
     But none of that detracts from the breathless pacing or sheer fun of the novel.  It opens in the middle of a robbery and continues with action and suspense.  I think I would have enjoyed this even more as an adolescent because throughout the book a seventeen-year-old student matched wits with Lupin.  The contestants were well matched.

     I recommend this for a fun read with the flavor of the early 1900s.


The Profiteers by E. Phillips Oppenheimer A review by Warren Bull
     The novel was published in 1921. It was one of many novels, written by Oppenheimer. He is credited with at least fifty works of fiction.
     The Profiteers is very much a book of its time. The hero is intrepid, i.e., brave, wealthy, handsome, brilliant, relentless, athletic, a gourmet, a patron of the arts and well mannered. The heroine is completely desirable, i.e., beautiful, refined, resourceful and intelligent. The villain is dastardly, i.e., rude, crude, lecherous, cunning and not handsome.
     None of them changes in any substantial way over the course of the novel. The hero has problems to overcome, but once he enacts the scheme he hatches, he suffers no setbacks along the way. 

The language of the book is stilted, but more readable today than other novels of the time. I was not able to predict the way the hero would act. For a novel where not much happens, the pace is good. It is an entertaining work and a good read. I can see why the author was popular.

4 comments:

Gloria Alden said...

Warren, it sounds like a fun read. I'll have to write down the title and hope to find it somewhere someday.

Margaret S. Hamilton said...

so much fun to read your reviews. I remember books similar to these at my grandparent's home. I've been a Rex Stout fan ever since.

KM Rockwood said...

Another fun novel from the past! Thank you, Warren, for dredging these up for us.

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