If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Here are the upcoming WWK interviews for the month of July!

July 4th Christopher Huang, A Gentleman's Murder

July 11th V. M. Burns, The Plot Is Murder

July 18th Edith Maxwell (Maddie Day), Death Over Easy

July 25th Shari Randall, Against The Claw


Our July Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 7/7--Mary Feliz, 7/14--Annie Hogsett, 7/21--Margaret S. Hamilton, 7/28--Kait Carson.

Our special bloggers for the fifth Monday and Tuesday of July--Kaye George and Paula Gail Benson.


Please welcome two new members to WWK--Annette Dashofy, who will blog on alternative Sundays with Jim Jackson, and Nancy Eady, who will blog on every fourth Monday. Thanks for blogging with us Annette and Nancy!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Annette Dashofy's Uneasy Prey was released in March. It is the sixth Zoe Chambers Mystery. The seventh, Cry Wolf, will be released on September 18th. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Annette on September 19th.

Carla Damron's quirky short story, "Subplot", was published in the Spring edition of The Offbeat Literary Journal. You can find it here: http://offbeat.msu.edu/volume-18-spring-2018/


Tina Whittle's sixth Tai Randolph mystery, Necessary Ends, debuts on April 3, 2018. Look for it here. Tina was nominated for a Derringer Award for her novelette, "Trouble Like A Freight Train Coming." We're all crossing our fingers for her.

James M. Jackson's Empty Promises, the next in the Seamus McCree mystery series (5th), was published on April 3, 2018. Purchase links are here. He's working on Seamus McCree #6 (False Bottom)


Dark Sister, a poetry collection, is Linda Rodriguez's tenth published book. It's available for sale here:


Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


Shari Randall's second Lobster Shack Mystery, Against the Claw, will be available in July 31, 2018.

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Friday, February 26, 2016

Reviews of The Hollow Needle and The Profiteers



THE HOLLOW NEEDLE by Maurice Leblanc
A Review by Warren Bull

      Originally published in 1911, The Hollow Needle is one in a series of work about the criminal mastermind Arsene Lupin. Lupin’s daring exploits, clever escapes, extraordinary physical abilities and ability to outwit the police make him larger than life. He is a character like d’Artagnan.  Reading requires a greater suspension of disbelief than most novels.  The heroic Lupin interrupts the action from time to time to make florid speeches about his own brilliance. 
Lupin does not appear for about the first third of the book.  One chapter was written in the first person while all others were written in the third person.  I noticed that every false message sent tricked whoever received it.  Every disguise was successful.  An English detective named Holmlock Shears put in an appearance.
     But none of that detracts from the breathless pacing or sheer fun of the novel.  It opens in the middle of a robbery and continues with action and suspense.  I think I would have enjoyed this even more as an adolescent because throughout the book a seventeen-year-old student matched wits with Lupin.  The contestants were well matched.

     I recommend this for a fun read with the flavor of the early 1900s.


The Profiteers by E. Phillips Oppenheimer A review by Warren Bull
     The novel was published in 1921. It was one of many novels, written by Oppenheimer. He is credited with at least fifty works of fiction.
     The Profiteers is very much a book of its time. The hero is intrepid, i.e., brave, wealthy, handsome, brilliant, relentless, athletic, a gourmet, a patron of the arts and well mannered. The heroine is completely desirable, i.e., beautiful, refined, resourceful and intelligent. The villain is dastardly, i.e., rude, crude, lecherous, cunning and not handsome.
     None of them changes in any substantial way over the course of the novel. The hero has problems to overcome, but once he enacts the scheme he hatches, he suffers no setbacks along the way. 

The language of the book is stilted, but more readable today than other novels of the time. I was not able to predict the way the hero would act. For a novel where not much happens, the pace is good. It is an entertaining work and a good read. I can see why the author was popular.

3 comments:

Gloria Alden said...

Warren, it sounds like a fun read. I'll have to write down the title and hope to find it somewhere someday.

Margaret Turkevich said...

so much fun to read your reviews. I remember books similar to these at my grandparent's home. I've been a Rex Stout fan ever since.

KM Rockwood said...

Another fun novel from the past! Thank you, Warren, for dredging these up for us.