If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


WWK's May interviews will be: 5/2--indie author Bobbi Holmes, 5/9--TG Wolff (aka--Anita Devito), 5/16--Chocolate Bonbon author Dorothy St. James, 5/23--Lida Sideris, 5/30--Food Lovers' Village (and multiple Agatha winner) Leslie Budwitz. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


Our May Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 5/5--John Carenen, 5/12--Judy Penz Sheluk, 5/19--Margaret S. Hamilton, 5/26--Kait Carson.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Tina Whittle's sixth Tai Randolph mystery, Necessary Ends, debuts on April 3, 2018. Look for it here. Tina was nominated for a Derringer Award for her novelette, "Trouble Like A Freight Train Coming." We're all crossing our fingers for her.

James M. Jackson's Empty Promises, the next in the Seamus McCree mystery series (5th), will be available on April 3, 2018. Purchase links are here.


Dark Sister, a poetry collection, is Linda Rodriguez's tenth published book. It's available for sale here:


Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with the authors in this anthology on 4/14! Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


Shari Randall's second Lobster Shack Mystery, Against the Claw, will be available in August, 2018.


In addition, our prolific KM has had the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," appears in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: A Fifth Course of Chaos.

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Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Shaun the Sheep and writing


Shaun the Sheep

I watched a British cartoon online with my grandchildren this weekend. Shaun is the smallest sheep but he always gets into trouble. A head of cabbage flies out of a truck and he decides to play soccer and gets the other sheep to go along with the idea. 

There’s one very large furry sheep that ends up with items stuck in his fleece. When Shaun kicks a head of cabbage and it breaks a window, he goes up the steps and retrieves it, throws it out the window and it ends up in the mass of fleece. In order to retrieve it, he first pulls out a boot, then a horn and finally the cabbage.
When thinking about writing a novel, it seems we do the same thing. We start out with a small idea. Then the thought (the head of cabbage) flies out at us and gives us something to work with. We play around with the ideas, kick it around, get a goal and think we finally have it.

But alas, the cabbage gets kicked out of the field and there’s that sagging middle. How can we save it? The dog guarding the sheep falls asleep and the sheep continue struggling with the head of cabbage. The pigs snatch it, but the sheep retrieve it and go on with their game.
 
Finally, their game is back on track and the cabbage gets kicked into high gear. A flying duck ends up swallowing it and bloats up, flying off with the cabbage.

If we think of it, that’s how our stories go. We start off, get the idea, play around with it, get stuck, get more ideas and finally get the novel to where we think it should be.

Sometimes it works and we have our novel where it should be. Sometimes that flying duck takes it in the wrong place and we start on draft two or three or even ten. Eventually we’ll get there. But like the sheep, we have to keep trying and trying.

If you want to watch Shaun and his friends, take a look. http://www.metacafe.com/watch/691228/shaun_the_sheep/

Happy Writing! 

6 comments:

Warren Bull said...

A wild and wooly blog

E. B. Davis said...

I hope my plot never goes the way of the flying cabbage, Dee. That would be a baaaad plot. Guess I'd have to shear back such a plot and weave more fleecy intrigue into it.

Okay, I'll stop. Have fun with your grandkids and congratulations on all your promising markets for your writing!

Sandra Parshall said...

I love this -- and now you've got me watching sheep cartoons on the internet.

Pauline Alldred said...

Sounds like the games I play to pin down a plot. Grandkids teach us a lot, don't they?

Kaye George said...

My grandkids watch this on TV. I think it's probably BBC and they TIVO it. The workings are mysterious to me. I just let the grandkids press the buttons.

Love Shaun, though.

Kellie M. Rix said...

This is great, Dee. Write on! Thank you for sharing.