If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our July author interviews: Ellen Byerrum (7/5), Day of the Dark anthology authors (7/12 and 7/19), and Nancy Cole Silverman (7/26).

Saturday Guest Bloggers in July: 7/1--Fran Stewart, and 7/8--Nancy Cole Silverman. WWK Saturday bloggers write on 7/15--Margaret S. Hamilton, 7/22--Kait Carson, and 7/29--E. B. Davis.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.”

In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on October, 18, 2017. Look for the interview by E. B. Davis here on that date!

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Another interview with L.D. Harkrader





Another Interview with L.D. Harkrader

We had such a good response from your first interview and I learned so much about writing for younger readers that I’m happy to interview you again.

Thank you.

Please remind us about your background.

I have loved books from the minute I first held one in my hands. I loved bedtime stories and convinced my amazingly accommodating parents to read the same books to me over and over until I had memorized the stories and could recite them out loud—even before I knew how to read. My favorite was The Night Before Christmas, and to this day I can recite the entire poem, word for word.

In the third grade, I realized that somebody had to write all those books I loved to read, and decided that some day, one of those somebodies would be me. Now, nearly forty years later, I’m making that third-grade dream come true.

And what’s your background as a writer?

I’ve published nineteen books, including Airball: My Life in Briefs, which won the William Allen White Award for 5th to 8th grades, Nocturne, a young adult fantasy, and Daisy Diaz Shakes Up Camp, a picture book. My next book, The Adventures of Beanboy, about a boy who loves comic books and would love to be a superhero, will be released next fall, and in it, I finally get to combine my two loves, writing and art. I’m drawing the sketches and comic book panels that will be interspersed throughout the story.

And like Kirby Nickel, the main character in Airball, I’m a rabid Kansas Jayhawks basketball fan.

Definitely cool. I am a big fan of Airball, My life in Briefs. I found it a sweet, satisfying and quite entertaining read. Is the book you’re best known for?

Yes, it definitely is right now.

Spoken like a true author. Can you give us a brief summary?

Airball: My Life in Briefs is about Kirby Nickel, a 7th grader who’s convinced that Brett McGrew, the NBA superstar who grew up in his small, basketball-crazed town, is actually his father, and he will do anything, including play basketball in his underwear, to prove it.

That’s the quick version of the plot, but in my heart, Airball is better summed up by something Kirby’s cousin Bragger tells him early in the book: “Can’t be a hero if you’re afraid of looking like a fool.”

I know it was not marketed as a mystery, but isn't Kirby’s trying to solve the

puzzle of who his father is the engine that powers the whole book?

Yes! I’m so glad you said that. I wrote Airball very much as if I were writing a mystery. I knew that it would not be marketed as a mystery, and I was pretty sure I would be the only one in the world who saw it as a mystery, but the book is about Kirby gathering evidence to prove that NBA star Brett McGrew is his father. I was very conscious of planting clues and red herrings and playing fair with my reader. I also wanted to set up the ending so that it would be a surprise, but would also—because of the clues and foreshadowing—seem perfectly right, which is exactly what a mystery writer has to do.

I think you can make the argument that many books that haven’t been marketed as such are, at heart, mysteries.

I agree entirely, but I’m biased. I wrote a short story once about Hamlet as a P.I.

It makes sense to me.

Do you get asked if you have fantasies about young boys in their underwear?

No, only you asked me that. However, I’ve gotten letters from readers saying that reading about Kirby in his underwear has given them the courage to do things they were afraid to do, which is pretty satisfying to me as a writer.

I hope you’re writing a sequel.

When I visit schools, kids tell me the same thing. I would love to write a sequel, but at this point, no sequel is in the works. I don’t want to throw a book out there just for the sake of having a sequel. I first want to come up with a compelling story for Kirby and his life after Airball.

I hope you do there are lots of characters including Kirby’s friends, his coach and his grandmother I would like to know more about.

Thank you. I promise I’ll let you know.

1 comment:

Kaye George said...

Your book (the one for which you're known :)) reminds me of several things. One, that my son truly believed that Johnny Bench (at the time a catcher for the Cincy Reds) was his brother! A total fabrication, but he convinced his nursery school teacher it was true.

Two, that the world needs a sequel!