If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our August Author Interviews--8/2 Maggie Toussaint, 8/9 Kellye Garrett, 8/16 Matt Ferraz, 8/23 Matthew Iden, 8/30 Julia Buckley. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.

August Saturday Guest Bloggers: 8/5--Kathleen Kaska, 8/12 Triss Stein, WWK bloggers-Margaret S. Hamilton on 8/19 and Kait Carson on 8/26. Look for E. B. Davis's blog on 8/29--the fifth Tuesday of August.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.”

In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on October, 18, 2017. Look for the interview by E. B. Davis here on that date!

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Saturday, August 12, 2017

Brooklyn War by Triss Stein


The words “New York in wartime” are so evocative, and I live just a few miles from one of the places it evokes.  In fact, the opening moments of the musical “On the Town,” a story of sailors in the city in 1944, shows a line of sleepy workers at the gate, waiting for their workday to begin.

It is the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The battleship Arizona, where the war began for Americans, and the Missouri, where it ended, were both built there.  During the war it ran around the clock, every day, employing 70,000 people including women doing what had been men’s work. Eighteen years later it was closed, a victim of new forces too big to fight.

My research confirmed that it would be a great background for the fourth book in my mystery series about Brooklyn. The hard part would be choosing which stories to tell. In the end, I had three.

The frame is the rapidly changing, reborn Navy Yard. In fact, it is changing so quickly it has already passed what I wrote. Erica Donato, historian in training and my series heroine, goes to a community meeting about plans for the new Navy Yard and, exploring the historic grounds, witnesses a murder.         


The main plot is built around the huge conflict of the Yard’s closing.  Lifer employees, unions, congressmen, the Secretary of Defense – they were barely even speaking the same language on that heated issue. The murdered man, a speaker at the meeting, had plenty of enemies including ex-wives, but someone chose to shoot him at the Navy Yard. Who? And why? Blind chance – he was alone, it was dark?  Or more?

The third plot takes another step back, to those busy years of World War II.  Lives were changed by the war, and not just on the battlefields. Erica’s fearsome mother-in -law, learning Erica is researching the Yard, suddenly shares a bit of family history. A young aunt from an old Navy Yard family had battled her parents to work there, had loved it and then seemed unhappy ever after. The mother–in–law demands that Erica find out what happened to her.   

That task arrives on top of her advisor demanding she finish her long-delayed dissertation, her daughter demanding they plan a sixteenth birthday party, and recurrent dreams of a man being shot.

How she deals with it all became the story of Brooklyn Wars.

BIO: Triss Stein grew up in northernmost NY state but has spent most of her adult life in Brooklyn. This gives her a useful double perspective for writing mysteries about the neighborhoods of her constantly changing adopted home. In the new book, Brooklyn Wars, her heroine Erica Donato witnesses a murder at the famous Brooklyn Navy Yard and finds herself drawn deep into both old and current conflicts.



7 comments:

Jim Jackson said...

Triss - sounds like a very interesting interweaving of the three plot lines. Wishing you all the best with Brooklyn Wars.

~ Jim

Margaret Turkevich said...

I've enjoyed your other books and look forward to reading this one. I love learning about local history by reading fiction.

Shari Randall said...

Now I want to rewatch On the Town so I can see the Navy Yard. Best wishes with your new book!

Warren Bull said...

A very interesting plot. It sounds like a very good book.

KM Rockwood said...

I grew up in the area--uncles worked for the Navy Yard. And union activists. It'll be interesting to read about that place and time.

Grace Topping said...

Thanks, Triss, for stopping by Writers Who Kill. Your book really sounds intriguing.

Triss said...

My deep apologies for no responding sooner. I got caught up in family matters. Thanks to everyone for commenting. KM, I wish I'd "met" you sooner so we could have talked about the Navy Yard! GRACE and WARREN, thank you for the encouragement. MARGARET, I am glad you read the earlier books and even more glad you enjoyed them. SHARI I'm not sure what they show in the movie of On the Town - I saw it on stage. The movie leaves out a lot of the best show music but the dancing is great