Starting on 11/28 WWK presents original short stories by some of our authors. Here's our lineup:

11/28 Debra H. Goldstein, "Thanksgiving in Moderation"

12/5 Annette Dashofy, "Las Posadas--A New Mexico Christmas"

12/12 Warren Bull, "The Thanksgiving War"

12/19 KM Rockwood, "The Gift of Peace"

12/26 Paula Gail Benson, "The Lost Week of the Year"


If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.














November Interviews
11/6 Barbara Ross, Nogged Off
11/13 Lena Gregory, Scone Cold Killer
11/20 Lois Winston, Handmade Ho-Ho Homicide
11/27 V. M Burns, Bookmarked For Murder

Saturday Guest Bloggers:
11/2 V. M. Burns
11/9 Heather Redmond
11/16 Arlene Kay

WWK Bloggers: 11/23 Kait Carson

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Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Don't miss Shari Randall's "The Queen of Christmas" available on at Amazon. Shari's holiday story for WWK was too long so she published it for our enjoyment. It's available for 99 cents or on Kindle Unlimited for free!


KM Rockwood's "The Society" and "To Die A Free Man; the Story of Joseph Bowers" are included in the BOULD Awards Anthology, which was released on November 19. KM won second place with a cash prize for "The Society." Congratulations, KM! Kaye George's "Meeting on the Funicular" is also in this anthology, which can be bought for 99 cents on Kindle until November 30.


Paula Gail Benson's story "Wisest, Swiftest, Kindest" appears in Love in the Lowcountry an anthology by the Lowcountry Romance Writers available 11/5 in e-book and print format on Amazon. The anthology includes fourteen stories all based in Charleston, South Carolina.


Kaye George's "Grist for the Mill" was published in A Murder of Crows anthology, edited by Sandra Murphy on October 9th.


Lyrical Press will publish Kaye George's Vintage Sweets mystery series. The first book, Revenge Is Sweet, will be released in March. Look for the interview here on 3/11.

Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

Susan Van Kirk's A Death At Tippett Pond was released on June 15th. Read E. B. Davis's interview with Susan.

Warren Bull's Abraham Lincoln: Seldom Told Stories was released. It is available at: GoRead: https://www.goread.com/book/abraham-lincoln-seldom-told-stories or at Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/ydaklx8p

Grace Topping's mystery, Staging is Murder was released April 30. It is now also available in audio.

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Saturday, May 13, 2017

When Absurdity Becomes Reality by Maren Bradley Anderson


In 2008, I was trying to write my first novel. I wanted to write something funny and absurd, so I based my book on Aristophanes’s sex-strike play, The Lysistrata. When I was done, I thought I had written an off-the-wall novel about sex and politics, but to my surprise, the crazy presidential race I imagined in 2008 seemed, well, not so crazy in 2016.

The literary theorist in me makes the distinction between an absurdist story (like Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead) and absurd humor (like Monty Python’s Flying Circus). My novel Closing the Store is not a bleak story where characters try to cope with existential crises by endlessly flipping coins. Rather, it is a novel in which women try to attain world peace with a strip tease.

While I was writing the book, though, I wasn’t interested in whether it would be more Kafka-esque or Python-ian. I was simply having fun. Writing something with an absurd premise allowed me to use the tropes, stereotypes, and memes that made me happy. Since I was writing for my own enjoyment, I actually finished the book. But I never thought anyone would read it.

Fast forward eight years. In the winter of 2016, I was amazed by how weird the presidential election was becoming, so I offered my silly political novel to my publisher who published it.  As the campaign progressed, actual presidential candidates began behaving more and more like my absurd characters. Naturally, none of us knew that the election would turn out the way it did, but now my absurd book feels damn near prescient.

This brings me to the other supposedly absurd part of my book: whole sex strike thing. Aristophanes was pretty plain that, while the tactic worked in his play, he didn’t think a sex strike could actually be pulled off. His other plays contained truly absurd elements like talking frogs and ladders to the clouds.

However, in my lifetime there have been many sex and women’s strikes that worked. Notably, in 1975, 90% of women in Iceland went on strike (that is, they did no work, including housework or caring for children) to protest inequality. In 2003, women in Liberia held a sex strike (that is, rebellious celibacy) that helped rid the country of Charles Taylor. In 2016, Polish there was a women’s strike to protest a proposed total abortion ban. And the day after President Trump’s inauguration, 4 million women around the world marched to protest his election. I guess we don’t know if that last one has “worked” yet.

It blows my mind that both the political and the sex-strike parts of Closing the Store have gone from truly absurd to nearing normality in the span of eight years. It makes me wonder what Aristophanes might think. Perhaps he’d say that we are in for a spate of talking frogs.

Bio:
Maren Bradley Anderson is a writer, teacher and alpaca rancher in Oregon.  She teaches English at Western Oregon University and novel writing to new authors. She fills her days caring for alpacas, playing with her kids, and reading books that make her laugh. She has written two plays for the Apple Box Children’s Theater, and her poetry has appeared in The Timberline Review. Her novels Fuzzy Logic and Closing the Store are available online and through your local bookstore—just ask them to order them for you.

3 comments:

Margaret Turkevich said...

I saw a memorable performance of "Lysistrata Jones" at the U of Cincinnati last year, complete with an elaborate dance number on a basketball court on the stage. So funny and so wonderful.

Gloria Alden said...

This sounds like an interesting book, and quite timely, too.

KM Rockwood said...

Another example of life imitating fiction?

If anyone tried to write serious fiction about the recent election for president & the results, it would not have been accepted. It would be consigned to political satire and off-the-wall fantasy.

I hope you do well with your novel, which is now quite timely!