If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.














October Interviews
10/2 Debra H. Goldstein, Two Bites To Many
10/10 Connie Berry, A Legacy of Murder
10/17 Lida Sideris, Double Murder or Nothing
10/23 Toni L. P. Kelner writing as Leigh Perry, The Skeleton Stuffs A Stocking
10/30 Jennifer David Hesse, Autumn Alibi

Saturday Guest Bloggers:
10/5 Ang Pompano
10/12 Eyes of Texas Anthology Writers
10/19 Neil Plakcy

WWK Bloggers: 10/26 Kait Carson

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Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:



Lyrical Press will publish Kaye George's Vintage Sweets mystery series. The first book, Revenge Is Sweet, will be released in March. Look for the interview here on 3/11.

Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

Susan Van Kirk's A Death At Tippett Pond was released on June 15th. Read E. B. Davis's interview with Susan.

KM Rockwood's "Frozen Daiquiris" appears in The Best Laid Plans: 21 Stories of Mystery & Suspense, edited by Judy Penz Sheluk. The anthology was released on June 18th.


Fishy Business anthology authors include KM Rockwood, Debra Goldstein, and James M. Jackson. This volume was edited by Linda Rodriguez.


Please read Margaret S. Hamilton and Debra Goldstein's short stories (don't ask about their modus operandi) in a new anthology, Cooked To Death Vol. IV: Cold Cut Files.


Warren Bull's Abraham Lincoln: Seldom Told Stories was released. It is available at: GoRead: https://www.goread.com/book/abraham-lincoln-seldom-told-stories or at Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/ydaklx8p

Grace Topping's mystery, Staging is Murder was released April 30.

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Friday, May 12, 2017

Waking Up White by Debby Irving: A Review by Warren Bull




Waking Up White by Debby Irving: A Review by Warren Bull

Image from LoveThisPic



I suppose I am like many other people in the majority in this country in that I don’t consider myself 

racist. However, I have learned over time that I participate in a society that favors Caucasians over 

people of other races. Without even being aware of it until recently, I have taken full advantage of the 

privileges granted to white people and males throughout my life. 


Debbie Irving in writing Waking Up White takes the reader along for her twenty-five year odyssey of 

learning about race. She learned that race is an invention of society and not biology. She is 

remarkably honest in revealing her lack of awareness that as a white person she is a member of a 

race. She also talks about how as a “good person” she tried to help people of other races and why her 

attempts so often failed. 


Once started on the path toward enlightenment, she persisted despite false starts and failures along 

the way. What she discovered opened her eyes. She woke up to the reality.  I cannot do justice to the 

ideas covered in her book in this brief review.

Besides the author writes so clearly that I’m not sure I could express myself as well as she did.


I give this book my very highest recommendation.

2 comments:

Gloria Alden said...


I think I'll order this book or get it out of the library if I can find it. I did not grow up to be racist, in fact, my parents were very much against that. However, I have to admit that I never had a person of another race in my school, and in fact I never knew one until I started college at the age of 42. Then I made friends with several AA Women, although being in a mostly white area where the college was located, there weren't that many there, either. Once I started teaching, I had several African American children in my classroom, but being in a small white town, not many. I did have two student teachers who were African American that I mentored, and later in the local writers group I joined, there was a wonderful woman who became my friend. She's no longer with us, but there are two African American men, who I enjoy so much, especially an older one, Steve, is closer to my age. We laugh a lot together, and I've started editing his work when he asked me. He sends it to me by email attachments.

KM Rockwood said...

Thanks for showcasing this book, Warren It's one I was not familiar with.

I'm afraid racism and prejudice of all sorts is present in our society today, although recent political developments have been sufficiently shocking that it may have taken a back seat to other concerns. It's far from resolved, however, & we will have to deal with it.