If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Here are the upcoming WWK interviews for the month of June!

June 6 Maggie Toussaint, Confound It

June 13 Nicole J. Burton, Swimming Up the Sun

June 20 Julie Mulhern, Shadow Dancing

June 27 Abby L. Vandiver, Debut author, Secrets, Lies, & Crawfish Pies


Our June Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 6/2--Joanne Guidoccio, 6/9 Julie Mulhern, 6/16--Margaret S. Hamilton, 6/23--Kait Carson, and 6/30--Edith Maxwell.


Please welcome two new members to WWK--Annette Dashofy, who will blog on alternative Sundays with Jim Jackson, and Nancy Eady, who will blog on every fourth Monday. Thanks for blogging with us Annette and Nancy!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Annette Dashofy's Uneasy Prey was released in March. It is the sixth Zoe Chambers Mystery. The seventh, Cry Wolf, will be released on September 18th. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Annette on September 19th.

Carla Damron's quirky short story, "Subplot", was published in the Spring edition of The Offbeat Literary Journal. You can find it here: http://offbeat.msu.edu/volume-18-spring-2018/


Tina Whittle's sixth Tai Randolph mystery, Necessary Ends, debuts on April 3, 2018. Look for it here. Tina was nominated for a Derringer Award for her novelette, "Trouble Like A Freight Train Coming." We're all crossing our fingers for her.

James M. Jackson's Empty Promises, the next in the Seamus McCree mystery series (5th), was published on April 3, 2018. Purchase links are here. He's working on Seamus McCree #6 (False Bottom)


Dark Sister, a poetry collection, is Linda Rodriguez's tenth published book. It's available for sale here:


Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


Shari Randall's second Lobster Shack Mystery, Against the Claw, will be available in July 31, 2018.

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Friday, May 12, 2017

Waking Up White by Debby Irving: A Review by Warren Bull




Waking Up White by Debby Irving: A Review by Warren Bull

Image from LoveThisPic



I suppose I am like many other people in the majority in this country in that I don’t consider myself 

racist. However, I have learned over time that I participate in a society that favors Caucasians over 

people of other races. Without even being aware of it until recently, I have taken full advantage of the 

privileges granted to white people and males throughout my life. 


Debbie Irving in writing Waking Up White takes the reader along for her twenty-five year odyssey of 

learning about race. She learned that race is an invention of society and not biology. She is 

remarkably honest in revealing her lack of awareness that as a white person she is a member of a 

race. She also talks about how as a “good person” she tried to help people of other races and why her 

attempts so often failed. 


Once started on the path toward enlightenment, she persisted despite false starts and failures along 

the way. What she discovered opened her eyes. She woke up to the reality.  I cannot do justice to the 

ideas covered in her book in this brief review.

Besides the author writes so clearly that I’m not sure I could express myself as well as she did.


I give this book my very highest recommendation.

2 comments:

Gloria Alden said...


I think I'll order this book or get it out of the library if I can find it. I did not grow up to be racist, in fact, my parents were very much against that. However, I have to admit that I never had a person of another race in my school, and in fact I never knew one until I started college at the age of 42. Then I made friends with several AA Women, although being in a mostly white area where the college was located, there weren't that many there, either. Once I started teaching, I had several African American children in my classroom, but being in a small white town, not many. I did have two student teachers who were African American that I mentored, and later in the local writers group I joined, there was a wonderful woman who became my friend. She's no longer with us, but there are two African American men, who I enjoy so much, especially an older one, Steve, is closer to my age. We laugh a lot together, and I've started editing his work when he asked me. He sends it to me by email attachments.

KM Rockwood said...

Thanks for showcasing this book, Warren It's one I was not familiar with.

I'm afraid racism and prejudice of all sorts is present in our society today, although recent political developments have been sufficiently shocking that it may have taken a back seat to other concerns. It's far from resolved, however, & we will have to deal with it.