If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Here are the upcoming WWK interviews for the month of July!

July 4th Christopher Huang, A Gentleman's Murder

July 11th V. M. Burns, The Plot Is Murder

July 18th Edith Maxwell (Maddie Day), Death Over Easy

July 25th Shari Randall, Against The Claw


Our July Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 7/7--Mary Feliz, 7/14--Annie Hogsett, 7/21--Margaret S. Hamilton, 7/28--Kait Carson.

Our special bloggers for the fifth Monday and Tuesday of July--Kaye George and Paula Gail Benson.


Please welcome two new members to WWK--Annette Dashofy, who will blog on alternative Sundays with Jim Jackson, and Nancy Eady, who will blog on every fourth Monday. Thanks for blogging with us Annette and Nancy!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Annette Dashofy's Uneasy Prey was released in March. It is the sixth Zoe Chambers Mystery. The seventh, Cry Wolf, will be released on September 18th. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Annette on September 19th.

Carla Damron's quirky short story, "Subplot", was published in the Spring edition of The Offbeat Literary Journal. You can find it here: http://offbeat.msu.edu/volume-18-spring-2018/


Tina Whittle's sixth Tai Randolph mystery, Necessary Ends, debuts on April 3, 2018. Look for it here. Tina was nominated for a Derringer Award for her novelette, "Trouble Like A Freight Train Coming." We're all crossing our fingers for her.

James M. Jackson's Empty Promises, the next in the Seamus McCree mystery series (5th), was published on April 3, 2018. Purchase links are here. He's working on Seamus McCree #6 (False Bottom)


Dark Sister, a poetry collection, is Linda Rodriguez's tenth published book. It's available for sale here:


Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


Shari Randall's second Lobster Shack Mystery, Against the Claw, will be available in July 31, 2018.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Friday, May 13, 2016

Six Against the Yard by the Detection Club: A review by Warren Bull




Six Against the Yard by the Detection Club: A review by Warren Bull

Six Against the Yard is another work by members of the Detection Club. In this case the authors are Margery Allingham, Anthony Berkeley, Freeman Willis Croft, Father Knox, Dorothy L. Sayers and Russell Thorndike. Published in 1936, each of the authors wrote a short story intended to show a perfect method of committing murder. Following each story Ex-Superintendent Cornish, CID gave an account of how the fictional perpetrator might have been discovered by intelligent police investigation.

It is a clever concept for a book and the result fully justified my hopes. Cornish entered the contest with unfailing good humor and wit. His responses read as well as the stories.

I didn’t find any evil scheme that would inspire me to use it if I wanted to consign anyone to an eternal dirt nap. Of course I have no such intention. It’s merely chance that the major irritant to my peace of mind no longer lingers in the background. The book was published in 1936. Surely the crafty Ex-Superintendent is no longer with us. Is he?


If challenged to devise a perfect murder, what method seems infallible to you?

5 comments:

Kait said...

I would love to travel back in time and attend a meeting of the Detection Club. Can you imagine all the creative energy in that room! Alas, undetectable murder is so difficult in this day and age...or is it? I think, if you could stand watching the agony, feeding someone something that you knew would put them into anaphylaxis would work. Of course the exposure would have to take place somewhere far enough away from medical help that even if epipens or the like were available, the effect would have worn off.

Margaret Turkevich said...

I like monkshood poisoning.

Gloria Alden said...

Warren, this sounds like a great read. I wrote down the book to order. Kait, is right that it is harder today to get away murdering someone and making it look like it wasn't a murder.

Shari Randall said...

Warren, my TBR is tottering!
It would be grand to attend a meeting of the Detection Club. Martin Edwards is the current president. I looked up their pledge for new members:
"Do you promise that your detectives shall well and truly detect the crimes presented to them using those wits which it may please you to bestow upon them and not placing reliance on nor making use of Divine Revelation, Feminine Intuition, Mumbo Jumbo, Jiggery-Pokery, Coincidence, or Act of God?"
I do!

KM Rockwood said...

That Detection Club sounds like it must have been something. I'd like to have been a fly on the wall at their meetings.