If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


April Interviews













4/1 Jennifer Chow, Mimi Lee Gets A Clue
4/8 John Gaspard
4/15 Art Taylor, The Boy Detective & The Summer of '74
4/22 Maggie Toussaint, Seas the Day
4/29 Grace Topping, Staging Wars


Saturday Guest Bloggers
4/4 Sasscer Hill
4/18 Jackie Green


WWK Bloggers:
4/11 Paula Gail Benson
4/25 Kait Carson

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WWK is proud of our four Agatha nominees. Kaye George for Best Short Story--not her first time to be nominated, Connie Berry and Grace Topping for Best First Mystery Novel (wish they weren't having to compete against each other), and Annette Dashofy for Best Contemporary Novel--her fifth nomination!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Look for Kaye George and Margaret S. Hamilton's short stories in the new Mid-Century Murder by Darkhouse Books. Kaye's story is "Life and Death on the Road" and Margaret's story is titled "4BR/3.5BA Contemporary."


Kaye George's first novel in the Vintage Sweets mystery series, Revenge is Sweet, will be released on March 10th. Look for the interview here on March 11.


Grace Topping's second novel in Laura Bishop staging series, Staging Wars, will be released by Henery Press on April 28th. Look for the interview here on April 29th.


Don't miss Shari Randall's "The Queen of Christmas" available on at Amazon. Shari's holiday story for WWK was too long so she published it for our enjoyment. It's available for 99 cents or on Kindle Unlimited for free!


KM Rockwood's "The Society" and "To Die A Free Man; the Story of Joseph Bowers" are included in the BOULD Awards Anthology, which was released on November 19. KM won second place with a cash prize for "The Society." Congratulations, KM! Kaye George's "Meeting on the Funicular" is also in this anthology, which can be bought for 99 cents on Kindle until November 30.


Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

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Friday, May 27, 2016

Apprehensions &Convictions by Mark Johnson: A Review by Warren Bull






Apprehensions &Convictions by Mark Johnson: A Review by Warren Bull

At age fifty, who would quit a well-respected administrative job in the non-profit world to take a seventy-five percent reduction in salary to wear a uniform that some people see as a symbol of oppression and others see as a target to shoot at? The who is Mark Johnson. In Apprehensions &Convictions: Adventures of a 50-year-old Rookie Cop, Johnson tells not only who, but also why and what happens as the result of his unorthodox decision. He tells it well.

The author goes into detail about what it is like to discover the body of someone who died weeks before. He talks about getting sucker punched and forced to fight. He also explains why cops don’t lose fights.  Whether it is a high speed chase at midnight or responding to a domestic dispute call where the victim as well as the perpetrator may at any moment turn on the cop who is trying to help, Johnson gives a description that may give you goose bumps or make you sweat. 


The authenticity and honesty with which he writes is remarkable.  If you write about cops or the sort of people who deal with cops frequently, this is a book that should be read and kept as a reference. You can put it right next to Adam Plantinga’s 400 Things Cops Know. 

3 comments:

Margaret S. Hamilton said...

The perfect companion to my recent stint in the citizen's police academy. Thanks for writing about it.

Gloria Alden said...

Sounds interesting, Warren. I'll have to look into it.

KM Rockwood said...

Interesting information.

I've never heard of a police department that hired people for patrol officers when they were this old, but obviously someone must. I believe in this case it was Mobile.

I have to admit I'm a bit disheartened to think that the United Way, a nonprofit charity, pays people four times as much as a beginning police officer. Most of us think of police work as solid middle class jobs, paying a living wage.