If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.














January Interviews
1/1 Sherry Harris, Sell Low, Sweet Harriet
1/8 Barbara Ross, Sealed Off
1/15 Libby Klein, Theater Nights Are Murder
1/22 Carol Pouliot, Doorway To Murder
1/29 Julia Buckley, Death with A Dark Red Rose

Saturday Guest Bloggers:
1/4 Lisa Lieberman
1/11 Karen McCarthy
1/18 Trey Baker

WWK Bloggers: 1/25 Kait Carson, 1/30 E. B. Davis

*************************************************************************

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Don't miss Shari Randall's "The Queen of Christmas" available on at Amazon. Shari's holiday story for WWK was too long so she published it for our enjoyment. It's available for 99 cents or on Kindle Unlimited for free!


KM Rockwood's "The Society" and "To Die A Free Man; the Story of Joseph Bowers" are included in the BOULD Awards Anthology, which was released on November 19. KM won second place with a cash prize for "The Society." Congratulations, KM! Kaye George's "Meeting on the Funicular" is also in this anthology, which can be bought for 99 cents on Kindle until November 30.


Paula Gail Benson's story "Wisest, Swiftest, Kindest" appears in Love in the Lowcountry an anthology by the Lowcountry Romance Writers available 11/5 in e-book and print format on Amazon. The anthology includes fourteen stories all based in Charleston, South Carolina.


Kaye George's "Grist for the Mill" was published in A Murder of Crows anthology, edited by Sandra Murphy on October 9th.


Lyrical Press will publish Kaye George's Vintage Sweets mystery series. The first book, Revenge Is Sweet, will be released in March. Look for the interview here on 3/11.

Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

Susan Van Kirk's A Death At Tippett Pond was released on June 15th. Read E. B. Davis's interview with Susan.

Warren Bull's Abraham Lincoln: Seldom Told Stories was released. It is available at: GoRead: https://www.goread.com/book/abraham-lincoln-seldom-told-stories or at Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/ydaklx8p

Grace Topping's mystery, Staging is Murder was released April 30. It is now also available in audio.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Friday, May 27, 2016

Apprehensions &Convictions by Mark Johnson: A Review by Warren Bull






Apprehensions &Convictions by Mark Johnson: A Review by Warren Bull

At age fifty, who would quit a well-respected administrative job in the non-profit world to take a seventy-five percent reduction in salary to wear a uniform that some people see as a symbol of oppression and others see as a target to shoot at? The who is Mark Johnson. In Apprehensions &Convictions: Adventures of a 50-year-old Rookie Cop, Johnson tells not only who, but also why and what happens as the result of his unorthodox decision. He tells it well.

The author goes into detail about what it is like to discover the body of someone who died weeks before. He talks about getting sucker punched and forced to fight. He also explains why cops don’t lose fights.  Whether it is a high speed chase at midnight or responding to a domestic dispute call where the victim as well as the perpetrator may at any moment turn on the cop who is trying to help, Johnson gives a description that may give you goose bumps or make you sweat. 


The authenticity and honesty with which he writes is remarkable.  If you write about cops or the sort of people who deal with cops frequently, this is a book that should be read and kept as a reference. You can put it right next to Adam Plantinga’s 400 Things Cops Know. 

3 comments:

Margaret S. Hamilton said...

The perfect companion to my recent stint in the citizen's police academy. Thanks for writing about it.

Gloria Alden said...

Sounds interesting, Warren. I'll have to look into it.

KM Rockwood said...

Interesting information.

I've never heard of a police department that hired people for patrol officers when they were this old, but obviously someone must. I believe in this case it was Mobile.

I have to admit I'm a bit disheartened to think that the United Way, a nonprofit charity, pays people four times as much as a beginning police officer. Most of us think of police work as solid middle class jobs, paying a living wage.