If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.














October Interviews
10/2 Debra H. Goldstein, Two Bites To Many
10/10 Connie Berry, A Legacy of Murder
10/17 Lida Sideris, Double Murder or Nothing
10/23 Toni L. P. Kelner writing as Leigh Perry, The Skeleton Stuffs A Stocking
10/30 Jennifer David Hesse, Autumn Alibi

Saturday Guest Bloggers:
10/5 Ang Pompano
10/12 Eyes of Texas Anthology Writers
10/19 Neil Plakcy

WWK Bloggers: 10/26 Kait Carson

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Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:



Lyrical Press will publish Kaye George's Vintage Sweets mystery series. The first book, Revenge Is Sweet, will be released in March. Look for the interview here on 3/11.

Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

Susan Van Kirk's A Death At Tippett Pond was released on June 15th. Read E. B. Davis's interview with Susan.

KM Rockwood's "Frozen Daiquiris" appears in The Best Laid Plans: 21 Stories of Mystery & Suspense, edited by Judy Penz Sheluk. The anthology was released on June 18th.


Fishy Business anthology authors include KM Rockwood, Debra Goldstein, and James M. Jackson. This volume was edited by Linda Rodriguez.


Please read Margaret S. Hamilton and Debra Goldstein's short stories (don't ask about their modus operandi) in a new anthology, Cooked To Death Vol. IV: Cold Cut Files.


Warren Bull's Abraham Lincoln: Seldom Told Stories was released. It is available at: GoRead: https://www.goread.com/book/abraham-lincoln-seldom-told-stories or at Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/ydaklx8p

Grace Topping's mystery, Staging is Murder was released April 30.

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Friday, April 29, 2016

The Case of the Gilded Fly by Edmund Crispin: A review by Warren Bull

   

The Case of the Gilded Fly was published in 1944. Edmund Crispin is generally considered a literary mystery author. The novel makes many references to classic literature and music, most of which I did not know. I’m sure much of the wittiness and humor went over my head. Maybe that is why I did not like the book. The Case of the Gilded Fly is the first Gervase Fen mystery.
So much of reading is a matter of taste. Someone else, especially someone well versed in the classics, might enjoy the book. For me, by not introducing the main character in the prologue or the first chapter the author had me following a secondary character for most of the novel. It was sort of like trying to understand a Sherlock Holmes mystery by paying close attention to Dr. Watson. 
I found it disturbing that the murder victim’s death was nearly celebrated by the majority of the characters who compared it to drowning unwanted kittens or exterminating vermin. Even the protagonist had mixed feelings about telling the police who committed the crime and how it was done. Personally, I don’t find drowning kittens with exterminating termites or ants to be morally equivalent. In my opinion neither comes close to the immorality of killing a person.Although the woman killed was a truly awful person, I think discovering and punishing murder is part of a civilized society.
The novel was written and set when World War II was part of everyone’s life. In that war millions of people were slaughtered. The perception of a single death might well have been different back then.
I can report that the writing is well done and quite literate.  The manner of presenting the crime was fair. The method of death was ingenious. 

One of my quirks is that I rarely like books in which I do not find any character compelling. That does not mean the character has to be likeable, but I prefer having someone to root for. I will settle for having someone to root against. In this book I thought all the main characters in the novel were obnoxious in one way or another. Characters treated each other with condescension, which I did not find amusing. The Case of the Gilded Fly was not my cup of tea.

3 comments:

Julie Tollefson said...

Good review, Warren. I think I would have trouble finishing this book. As I get older, it's so much easier to put down a book that doesn't grab me in any way, and this one sounds like it would definitely be easy to put down.

Carla Damron said...

It's interesting that the writer chose to only use unlikeable characters. Wonder if they'd be published today?

Kait said...

Oh, this does not sound like the book for me! I wonder what Crispin was thinking!