If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Here are the upcoming WWK interviews for the month of June!

June 6 Maggie Toussaint, Confound It

June 13 Nicole J. Burton, Swimming Up the Sun

June 20 Julie Mulhern, Shadow Dancing

June 27 Abby L. Vandiver, Debut author, Secrets, Lies, & Crawfish Pies


Our June Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 6/2--Joanne Guidoccio, 6/9 Julie Mulhern, 6/16--Margaret S. Hamilton, 6/23--Kait Carson, and 6/30--Edith Maxwell.


Please welcome two new members to WWK--Annette Dashofy, who will blog on alternative Sundays with Jim Jackson, and Nancy Eady, who will blog on every fourth Monday. Thanks for blogging with us Annette and Nancy!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Annette Dashofy's Uneasy Prey was released in March. It is the sixth Zoe Chambers Mystery. The seventh, Cry Wolf, will be released on September 18th. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Annette on September 19th.

Carla Damron's quirky short story, "Subplot", was published in the Spring edition of The Offbeat Literary Journal. You can find it here: http://offbeat.msu.edu/volume-18-spring-2018/


Tina Whittle's sixth Tai Randolph mystery, Necessary Ends, debuts on April 3, 2018. Look for it here. Tina was nominated for a Derringer Award for her novelette, "Trouble Like A Freight Train Coming." We're all crossing our fingers for her.

James M. Jackson's Empty Promises, the next in the Seamus McCree mystery series (5th), was published on April 3, 2018. Purchase links are here. He's working on Seamus McCree #6 (False Bottom)


Dark Sister, a poetry collection, is Linda Rodriguez's tenth published book. It's available for sale here:


Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


Shari Randall's second Lobster Shack Mystery, Against the Claw, will be available in July 31, 2018.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Saturday, March 3, 2018

Find Your Writers’ Group by Heather Weidner

Many thanks to the Writers Who Kill for letting me visit today to talk about writing.

Writing is typically a solitary activity, and it is very easy for authors to become isolated in their writing caves. I believe writers need to balance their time between the writing and social lives. They need to focus on researching, writing, and revising, but networking and learning from others are also important to the writing life. Writers need others to chat with, brainstorm ideas, and share celebrations (and setbacks). I am very fortunate to be a part of several writing groups (Sisters in Crime, Sisters in Crime – Central Virginia, Guppies, and James River Writers).

Find your group of like minds. Locate a writers' group for networking and idea sharing. My groups provide classes, workshops, seminars, networking, and book signing opportunities. I'm in several online groups, and they offer me training and critique group opportunities. To me, these groups are invaluable. The members are so generous with their time, and they're willing to answer questions and provide guidance. Just make sure you're not over extending yourself by joining lots of groups. Many of these groups also offer publication collaboration opportunities with anthologies.

My critique groups are invaluable for their feedback and beta reads. I am in an online one, and we exchange critiques via email. My other group meets monthly at a local library. Both of my groups are made up of mystery writers. That's my genre, and that's where I want to focus my time and energy. Some groups are open to all genres. Find what works best for you. I agree to review and critique their work, and they do the same for mine. I like the feedback from different perspectives, and the time investment pays dividends with my writing.

Find authors who are similar to your style in your area to share author panels and book signings. It's more fun when there are others to share book talks and signings. I love going to events and meeting new writers.

Look for partnership opportunities with other authors (e.g. anthologies, boxed sets, special sales, guest blogs, and social media take-overs). These are great ways to share your work with readers with similar interests and to broaden your audience. Seek out volunteer opportunities. There are many groups that are looking for speakers and instructors for workshops. It's a great way to meet peoples (and readers). I am very fortunate that librarians and others contact our writing group with events that we share with our members. I've done programs at libraries, schools, senior facilities, and book clubs. Take advantage of your library. There are so many resources there. And many offer programs that need speakers and instructors. Get to know your librarians. 

Each of my writing groups offer me support, new ideas, advice, and comradery. And they also help me to understand that I'm not alone on my writing journey.

Heather Weidner’s short stories appear in the Virginia is for Mysteries series and 50 Shades of Cabernet. She is a member of Sisters in Crime – Central Virginia, Guppies, and James River Writers. The Tulip Shirt Murders is her second novel in her Delanie Fitzgerald series.
Originally from Virginia Beach, Heather has been a mystery fan since Scooby Doo and Nancy Drew. She lives in Central Virginia with her husband and a pair of Jack Russell terriers.
Heather earned her BA in English from Virginia Wesleyan College and her MA in American literature from the University of Richmond. Through the years, she has been a technical writer, editor, college professor, software tester, and IT manager. She blogs regularly with the Pens, Paws, and Claws authors.

Synopsis of The Tulip Shirt Murders
Private investigator Delanie Fitzgerald, and her computer hacker partner, Duncan Reynolds, are back
for more sleuthing in The Tulip Shirt Murders. When a music producer hires the duo to find out who is bootlegging his artists’ CDs, Delanie uncovers more than just copyright thieves. And if chasing bootleggers isn’t bad enough, local strip club owner and resident sleaze, Chaz Smith, pops back into Delanie’s life with more requests. The police have their man in a gruesome murder, but the loud-mouthed strip club owner thinks there is more to the open and shut case. Delanie and Duncan link a series of killings with no common threads. And they must put the rest of the missing pieces together before someone else is murdered.

The Tulip Shirt Murders is a fast-paced mystery that appeals to readers who like a strong female sleuth with a knack for getting herself in and out of humorous situations such as larping and trading elbow jabs with roller derby queens.

Pens, Paws, and Claws Blog: http://penspawsandclaws.com/
Amazon Authors: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00HOYR0MQ

Book Links

7 comments:

Jim Jackson said...

Heather - Welcome to WWK. You make excellent points about how being connected benefits us as writers. As a co-author with WWK's Tina Whittle of a story included in Fifty Shades of Cabernet, it's been great to participate with one of your affiliated groups!

~ Jim

Margaret Turkevich said...

Interesting ideas for groups.

E. B. Davis said...

Welcome back to WWK, Heather. Your titles are intriguing! Thanks for blogging with us.

KM Rockwood said...

You're right about finding groups of writers with whom you can socialize and share work and ideas. The input from a variety of writers who have similar goals but different perspectives is invaluable.

Gloria Alden said...

Heather, I belong to a Sisters in Crime chapter, but the group I like best don't write mysteries. It's a local group who meets in a nearby library once a month. We've been together for a long time and share what we've written like essays, poetry, or the latest chapter of the books we're writing.Any input is never putting down but first praise and the some suggestions that might make it better, although that is usually rare. We laugh a lot, not about what was written, but other things and often go out to lunch after the meeting.

My two critique partners are Guppies I've been with for many years now. There were supposed to be four of us, but one never showed up. I've only met one of them in person when we met at a mystery conference and other time when she happened to be in my area. The other one is from England, and someday I want to go there to meet her in person. We not only share our work to be edited, but have become close friends, too.

You're right that you need time to spend with others rather than spend hours writing. I also belong to two book clubs and so enjoy our meetings discussing books as well as eating a meal together.

Warren Bull said...

I agree on the importance of finding a critique group and helping to make it one that helps all the members.

Kait said...

What a wonderful post. Find your tribe.