If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


June Interviews













6/3 Gretchen Archer, Double Trouble
6/10 Kaye George, Deadly Sweet Tooth
6/17 Annette Dashofy, Til Death
6/24 Adam Meyer


Saturday Guest Bloggers

6/6 Mary Keliikoa
6/13 William Ade
6/20 Liz Milliron


WWK Bloggers:

6/27 Kait Carson
6/30 WWK Writers--What We're Reading Now

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Susan Van Kirk's Three May Keep A Secret has been republished by Harlequinn's Worldwide Mystery. The WWK interview about the book can be accessed here. We're so glad another publisher picked up this series.


KM Rockwood's "Burning Desire," and Paula Gail Benson's "Living One's Own Truth," have been published in the anthology Heartbreaks & Half-truths. Congratulations to all of the WWK writers.


Please join Margaret S. Hamilton's Kings River Life podcast of her short story "Busted at the Book Sale" here. Congratulations, Margaret!


WWK is proud of our four Agatha nominees. Kaye George for Best Short Story--not her first time to be nominated, Connie Berry and Grace Topping for Best First Mystery Novel, and Annette Dashofy for Best Contemporary Novel--her fifth nomination! All are winners but without Agatha Teapots. Onto 20121!


Look for Kaye George and Margaret S. Hamilton's short stories in the new Mid-Century Murder by Darkhouse Books. Kaye's story is "Life and Death on the Road" and Margaret's story is titled "4BR/3.5BA Contemporary."


Grace Topping's second novel in Laura Bishop staging series, Staging Wars, was released by Henery Press on April 28th. Look for the interview here from April 29th.


Kaye George's second novel in the Vintage Sweets mystery series, Deadly Sweet Tooth, was released on June 2. Look for the interview here on June 10.


Annette Dashofy's 10th Zoe Chambers mystery, Til Death, will be released on June 16th. Look for the interview here on June 17.


Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

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Friday, August 5, 2011

Report from Christchurch



Report from Christchurch

The earthquakes continue frequently. Most are too small to feel. I’ve seen the downtown where several areas are still blocked off. I know the destroyed building only from pictures. People who live here say they are heartbroken to see the magnificent cathedral and other classic buildings fallen, standing as structural skeletons or red-tagged for demolition. Many people are still in temporary structures without bathrooms or heating. Many temporary offices are in tent labeled AFT which stands for “Another Frigging Tent.”

Over the weekend we had the coldest temperatures and the most snow in 19 years. The University of Canterbury, schools and most businesses were closed. Police advised people to stay home. Many of those who did not heed the warning spun and slid on icy streets, driving too fast and recklessly for conditions Locals called this, “The icing on the earthquake.”

Workers told me, “It makes a change from shoveling silt to shoveling snow.” Although some people saw the snow as just one more burden, children seemed to enjoy it, making snowmen and having snowball fights. Other people said the snow renewed their sense of purpose.






Christchurch is in that long slow painful phase known as recovery. Much that was lost will never return, many tough decisions have to be made and additional losses are bound to occur. At the same time, small victories are occurring. Favorite restaurants and stores are reopening in safer areas. People enjoy rediscovering them. Bus lines are expanding fitfully into their former territory. People share their stories of loss and survival. They also talk about rebuilding and their hopes for the future.

The university has maps indicating which buildings are closed, where to assemble if/when another serious quake occurs and where to find security staff. A bank branch and a bus line terminal once on campus are closed. Some visiting professors cancelled their visits but others have come instead.

World cup rugby and city-wide art festivals are optimistically planned for later this year. Life goes on.

2 comments:

E. B. Davis said...

You're in New Zealand at a pivotal time, Warren. Without having to experience the horror of an earthquake, you are witnessing the regeneration. Seems that they have a sardonic sense of humour, which will see them through.

There's just nothing you can do about natural events but cope. I remember seeing Pompeii, Italy--the remains of a family encased by lava, the mother and father trying to protect their child within their embrace--for naught.

Human instincts remain the same regardless of time.

Kara Cerise said...

When I read about the children who enjoyed the snow and the festivals planned for this year despite everything Mother Nature has thrown at Christchurch, I thought of the quote, "Hope springs eternal."