If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


February Interviews













2/5 Heather Weidner, Glitter, Glam, and Contraband
2/12 Rhys Bowen, Above The Bay of Angels
2/19 Elizabeth Penney, Hems & Homicide
2/26 Annette Dashofy, Under The Radar


Saturday Guest Bloggers:
2/1 Valerie Burns
2/8 Jeannette de Beauvoir
2/15 Kathryn Lane

WWK Bloggers: 2/22 Kait Carson, 1/28 & 1/29 Special Interviews with Agatha Nominees by Paula Gail Benson

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WWK is proud of our four Agatha nominees. Kaye George for Best Short Story--not her first time to be nominated, Connie Berry and Grace Topping for Best First Mystery Novel (wish they weren't having to compete against each other), and Annette Dashofy for Best Contemporary Novel--her fifth nomination!


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Look for Kaye George and Margaret S. Hamilton's short stories in the new Mid-Century Murder by Darkhouse Books. Kaye's story is "Life and Death on the Road" and Margaret's story is titled "4BR/3.5BA Contemporary."


Kaye George's first novel in the Vintage Sweets mystery series, Revenge is Sweet, will be released on March 10th. Look for the interview here on March 11.


Grace Topping's second novel in Laura Bishop staging series, Staging Wars, will be released by Henery Press on April 28th. Look for the interview here on April 29th.


Don't miss Shari Randall's "The Queen of Christmas" available on at Amazon. Shari's holiday story for WWK was too long so she published it for our enjoyment. It's available for 99 cents or on Kindle Unlimited for free!


KM Rockwood's "The Society" and "To Die A Free Man; the Story of Joseph Bowers" are included in the BOULD Awards Anthology, which was released on November 19. KM won second place with a cash prize for "The Society." Congratulations, KM! Kaye George's "Meeting on the Funicular" is also in this anthology, which can be bought for 99 cents on Kindle until November 30.


Paula Gail Benson's story "Wisest, Swiftest, Kindest" appears in Love in the Lowcountry an anthology by the Lowcountry Romance Writers available 11/5 in e-book and print format on Amazon. The anthology includes fourteen stories all based in Charleston, South Carolina.


Kaye George's "Grist for the Mill" was published in A Murder of Crows anthology, edited by Sandra Murphy on October 9th.



Shari Randall will be writing again for St. Martin's, perhaps under a pseudonym. We look forward to reading Shari's Ice Cream Shop Mystery series debuting next year. Congratulations, Shari!

Susan Van Kirk's A Death At Tippett Pond was released on June 15th. Read E. B. Davis's interview with Susan.

Warren Bull's Abraham Lincoln: Seldom Told Stories was released. It is available at: GoRead: https://www.goread.com/book/abraham-lincoln-seldom-told-stories or at Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/ydaklx8p

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Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Managing Writing Time


Managing Writing Time

I’m supposed to be writing nonstop this week and do so without editing. I haven’t found time to start.

My excuses? I really do have some. Yesterday was a granddaughter’s birthday and I made a big pot of chicken and dumplings, enough to serve at a soup kitchen. I never know how many I’ll have to feed. As it turned out there were only 8 adults and, 2 toddlers and 2 babies.

Of course, I had to bake a cake. Certainly not one from a box, it had to be from scratch. And then for those who didn’t want chocolate, I had to make the pie, from scratch. By the time they all left and I cleaned up the mess it was time for Desperate Housewives. I can’t help it, I’m hooked on them. And besides my cousin from Oregon called and we talked nearly an hour and then I told him I simply had to go to see the housewives and what sort of trouble they were getting into.

I got up early this morning and had to go through emails. Yep, had to talk to the Dell guy to get my son’s computer ordered and read all the mail. And I still haven’t finished this blog. But I did work on the stuff for my future web page that a friend is building for me. Shouldn’t this all be considered writing time?

As I sit here typing, I wonder how I should proceed with the novel. Which direction should my main character take? What danger can I lead her to? Should I let her get shot or step into a trap of the bad guys and see how she manages to escape? Really, I can’t do it all for Ellagrace. She needs to tell me what she wants to do.

Tell me how you manage to handle your writing time vs your family time. Maybe I can learn how to ignore my family and write!

6 comments:

E. B. Davis said...

Just before coming to this blog, I read another. The author interviewed had earned two degrees, worked as a free-lance musician, among other jobs, just finished three novels, had three more in the works...and then the blog stated that she is the mother of nine! Sorry-no way. I just don't believe it. On the jacket of my book, want the truth and nothing but the truth. "She did as well as she could, considering..."

Warren Bull said...

I'm not at all certain how many novels and short stories are written by hermits. Last week I told a friend I would be writing one afternoon and he said, "Good. Since you won't be doing anything I'll call you then." J.K. Rowling wrote in teashops during her baby's naps. Most of us write whenever we can.

Pauline Alldred said...

I agree that we write when we can. I wonder whether writers who seem to create despite overwhelming odds are writers who get it right first time. I've listened to at least two well-known authors say they write only one draft. I make several attempts before the story turns out the way I want and that takes time.

Warren Bull said...

I know only one writer who, supposedly, writes only one draft and I have never heard her say that directly.
Maybe people who write multiple books can manage that but the successful writers I know take the time to revise. I sometimes read books that are subpar for the author and think the author failed to rewrite sufficiently maybe due to deadlines.

E. B. Davis said...

That's so funny, Warren, "since you won't be doing anything." So do you answer the phone while you're writing? I go through the same thing while doing bookkeeping for my husband. Everyone knows my schedule and when I'll be home "working," and yet they think I'll be free to talk with them, so I must not really be working.

Pauline Alldred said...

Friends and neighbors who are really nice people otherwise don't just assume writers are available. When I worked nights, friends would say,okay so I can call you around three and you can let me know what you think about my new drapes. In the end I used to say, only if you don't mind me calling you at three in the morning to ask you which is the best hand santizer.