If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book next year, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our April author interviews: Perennial author Susan Wittig Albert--4/5, Sasscer Hill, horse racing insider--4/12, English historical, cozy author, TE Kinsey--4/19, Debut author, Susan Bickford--4/26.

Saturday Guest Bloggers in April: Heather Baker Weidner (4/1), Christina Hoag (4/8), Susan Boles (4/29). WWK Saturday bloggers write on 4/15--Margaret S. Hamilton and on 4/22--Kait Carson.

Julie Tollefson won the Mystery Writers of America Midwest Chapter's Holton Award for best unpublished manuscript (member category) for her work in progress, In The Shadows. Big news for a new year. Congratulations, Julie.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on June, 13, 2017. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Linda here in June!

Cross Genre Publications anthology, Hidden Youth, will contain Warren Bull's "The Girl, The Devil, and The Coal Mine." The anthology will be released in late November 2016. The We've Been Trumped anthology released by Dark House Press on September 28th contains Warren Bull's "The Wall" short story and KM Rockwood's "A Phone Call to the White House." KM writes under the name Pat Anne Sirs for this volume.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, July 15, 2016

When in Rome by Ngaio Marsh: A review by Warren Bull





When in Rome by Ngaio Marsh: A review by Warren Bull           

When in Rome was published in 1970. Ngaio Marsh took her detective, Superintendent Allyen, out of his familiar environment and dropped him into Rome where, it seems, almost anything might happen.
The Superintendent is sent to Rome to act as a tourist and see what he can learn about an international drug smuggling ring. A suspected member of the ring, Sebastian Mailer has set up an exclusive and very expensive personalized tour of the eternal city, which includes touring the Roman basilica of S. Tommaso where an author who wrote a popular book inspired by the site will address the group. Allyen joins the group, which exits the basilica without Mailer. Did he recognize Allyen and flee? Or is there a more sinister explanation? Searching for Mailer leads to the discovery of a hidden murder victim. 

The drug investigation of drug uncovers crimes of blackmail and murder.

Allyen is a charming character. The setting is unique. It has been suggested that the Basilica of San Clemente in Rome, which is a three tiered building used for religious practice in the second, third and eleventh centuries, is the model for fictional basilica in the novel. Superintendent’ Allyen’s diplomatic dealings with Roman police offer a humorous contrast to the deadly doings.  The plot is ingenious and woven like a spider’s web.  This is a thoroughly enjoyable novel.

7 comments:

KB Inglee said...

Love these revues of works I read in High School, just after I discovered Sherlock Holmes. Haven't read this one.

E. B. Davis said...

Is some of this series set in Egypt, Warren?

KM Rockwood said...

Ngaio Marsh is a master of crime fiction. I haven't read any of her work in a while, and your review is encouraging me to go back and reread some od it.

Margaret Turkevich said...

Kathleen, I'm with you. I'm going back to re-read Ngaio Marsh. Warren, thank you for the great reviews!

Kait said...

Sounds wonderful, Warren. I have this on my Kindle but I haven't gotten there yet.

Gloria Alden said...

Sounds interesting, Warren. Somewhere in my library I have some books by this author. I'll have to look for them.

Margaret Morse said...

I enjoyed your review; it's nice to know others appreciate the older works. I'm in the process of rereading as many of Ngaio Marsh's books as I can find. Great fun!