If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our September Author Interviews--9/6 Kathleen Valenti, 9/13 David Burnsworth, 9/20 Jeri Westerson, 9/27 Frances Brody. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.

September Saturday Guest Bloggers: 9/2--Anne Bannon, 9/9 WWK Bloggers, 9/16 Margaret S. Hamilton, 9/23 Kait Carson, and on 9/30 Trixie Stiletto.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.” In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.
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Friday, April 1, 2011

Great Moments in Civilization

Of course, farming, the use of fire, the invention of math and writing, the domestication of dogs and the domestication of humans by cats are noted as pivotal moments in human history. But there are other moment which pass with less notice such as:

When people first stood on two legs.

When Snoopy first stood on two legs.

When the head of a troupe of actors said, “Shakespeare if you are determined to act write me a play and I’ll give you a part in it.”

When Thomas Edison got tired of cleaning oil lamps.

When Queen Elizabeth thought, “I need a husband like a fish needs carriage.”

When one cave dweller said to another, “Don’t you think that wall would look better with a little color on it?

When a Pharaoh first said, “How can I be sure people will remember me?”

When Moses, while in the desert, said, “Lost? What do you mean, lost? I’ll have us out of here in no time at all.”

What moments in the development of civilization do you think warrant commemoration?

12 comments:

Ramona said...

When someone looked at a coffee bean and said, "I wonder if I could make a drink from that?"

I don't know who that person might be, but I'd like to thank them.

Pauline Alldred said...

Thanks for making me smile, Warren. When someone said, "We don't have to kill lions just because they're scary."

Warren Bull said...

Ramona,

My wife would agree with you.


Pauline,

Good thinking.

Anne K. Albert said...

It hasn't happened yet, at least I don't think so, but how about when politicians decide to tell the truth?

E. B. Davis said...

Dom Pierre Perignon, a Benedictine monk, didn't "invent" champagne since there were Romans before him experimenting and there were English contemporaries also experimenting. But, he kept making wines containing these annoying bubbles with regularity. Unfortunately, he also made bottle bombs because glass then wasn't strong enough and the CO2 exploded on him. It wasn't until the English invented stronger glass that Dom's experiments were put into practice--and now I can drink a glass of champagne after a hard day of writing. (Dom Perignon's a little too expensive though!)

Warren Bull said...

Anne,

That's a wonderful thought.

E.B.

I think someone wrote a song about that.

Donnell said...

Oh, Warren, this is so easy. The invention of the baby swing. :)

Warren Bull said...

Donnnell,

Silly me, I never even thought of that!

Peg Nichols said...

When Montezuma the Emperor of Mexico offered Hernando Cortez a drink of chocolate, Cortez turned to his first mate to ask, "Do you think we can get the folks back home to drink this stuff?

Warren Bull said...

Peg,

That day deserves a holiday all to itself!

towriteistowrite said...

The day Victor Borge's parents signed him up for piano lessons.

Warren Bull said...

Yes comma you apostrophe re right period.