If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our April author interviews: Perennial author Susan Wittig Albert--4/5, Sasscer Hill, horse racing insider--4/12, English historical, cozy author, TE Kinsey--4/19, Debut author, Susan Bickford--4/26.

Saturday Guest Bloggers in April: Heather Baker Weidner (4/1), Christina Hoag (4/8), Susan Boles (4/29). WWK Saturday bloggers write on 4/15--Margaret S. Hamilton and on 4/22--Kait Carson.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th. In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on June, 13, 2017. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Linda here in June!

Cross Genre Publications anthology, Hidden Youth, will contain Warren Bull's "The Girl, The Devil, and The Coal Mine." The anthology will be released in late November 2016. The We've Been Trumped anthology released by Dark House Press on September 28th contains Warren Bull's "The Wall" short story and KM Rockwood's "A Phone Call to the White House." KM writes under the name Pat Anne Sirs for this volume.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, May 6, 2016

The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins: A Review by Warren Bull



Generally considered the first mystery novel, The Moonstone, written by Wilkie Collins was first available as a serial in Charles Dicken’s weekly magazine All The Year Round. It was published in three volumes in 1868. It was described on its title page as A Romance. Years passed before the words A Detective Story came into use.

It is impossible to read with the wonder and excitement of readers of that time. We are today well acquainted with aspects of the novel that Collins invented and presented for the first time.
Nevertheless, it remains a rollicking good story and a pleasure to read. Collins settled on telling the story through first person narratives of characters, which witnessed a part of the whole. Each character is unique. By the story telling, readers gets a firm grasp on not only one part of the tale, but also the personality and beliefs of each individual. Collins is able to add humor and color by the variety of narrators.

Long before the “rules” of mystery writing were codified, Collins played absolutely fair with his readers. No character reports more than he or she knew. Clues are revealed as they occur.  If readers today do not find the events as shocking as the original readers did, it is because every mystery written after The Moonstone owes a great deal to the original. Despite the time it was written in — three years after the end of the American Civil War — The Moonstone comes across as almost a modern work.

We may like our heroines a shade less virtuous and the pace of the action at a much faster tempo than in the work, but I recommend it highly. The Moonstone is worth reading not just as a historical work but also as a mystery on its own merits.


10 comments:

Mary Feliz said...

I first read The Moonstone in high school and have read it several times since. I got such a ick out of the character who was always passing out religious tracts!

E. B. Davis said...

I know I need to go back and read classics, like Moonstone, but there are so many wonderful new books to read I doubt I'll go back to read these old milestones of the past. I'm glad to have an index to them through your blogs, Warren. Of course, were they to become available on Kindle, I may change my mind. Something to research today!

Carla Damron said...

Very interesting. We need to stay in touch with our roots.

Alice Duncan said...

This is one of my all-time favorite books. Mr. Betteredge (sp?) is probably my favorite character, too :-)

Margaret Turkevich said...

OK, I have heard of this one and I promise I'll read it.

Mary Feliz said...

EB Davis, The Moonstone and many other classics are available free on Kindle:
https://www.amazon.com/Moonstone-Wilkie-Collins-ebook/dp/B0084AYI92

E. B. Davis said...

Thanks, Mary!

Gloria Alden said...

Warren, I'm pretty sure I have this book somewhere, but I've never read it. Maybe I should dig
it out after I catch up on all the books I bought at Malice.

Shari Randall said...

Oh, Warren, one of my all time favorites. And it does feel modern, doesn't it?
The woman with the tracts - what a scream. One of the many pleasures of The Moonstone is the humor. A great read.

Donna Volkenannt said...

I'd never heard of this book, but you have made me want to read it.