If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


WWK's May interviews will be: 5/2--indie author Bobbi Holmes, 5/9--TG Wolff (aka--Anita Devito), 5/16--Chocolate Bonbon author Dorothy St. James, 5/23--Lida Sideris, 5/30--Food Lovers' Village (and multiple Agatha winner) Leslie Budwitz. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


Our May Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 5/5--John Carenen, 5/12--Judy Penz Sheluk, 5/19--Margaret S. Hamilton, 5/26--Kait Carson.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Tina Whittle's sixth Tai Randolph mystery, Necessary Ends, debuts on April 3, 2018. Look for it here. Tina was nominated for a Derringer Award for her novelette, "Trouble Like A Freight Train Coming." We're all crossing our fingers for her.

James M. Jackson's Empty Promises, the next in the Seamus McCree mystery series (5th), will be available on April 3, 2018. Purchase links are here.


Dark Sister, a poetry collection, is Linda Rodriguez's tenth published book. It's available for sale here:


Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with the authors in this anthology on 4/14! Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


Shari Randall's second Lobster Shack Mystery, Against the Claw, will be available in August, 2018.


In addition, our prolific KM has had the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," appears in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: A Fifth Course of Chaos.

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Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Turning Points

If you've read a book on writing, you're aware there are writers who map out their novels in detail so they know exactly where they're going. Then there are writers who start with a crime, a character, or an image and keep writing until they find out where they're heading and if their destination is worthwhile.

I need characters and a story, preferably one with a crime that calls out for justice. Caught up in the excitement of creating a novel world, I peck away at the keys on my laptop until good wins out over evil, or at least over one of its representatives. The result is often a 90,000 word story with too many detours. Not to worry. Writers have a chance to revise, unlike stand-up comedians. How to revise in an efficient way--that is the problem.

One of the advantages of belonging to the local chapter of Sisters in Crime (there's no discrimination against brothers) is being able to attend workshops free. I attended a workshop given by Hallie Ephron, author of the Edgar-nominated WRITING AND SELLING YOUR MYSTERY NOVEL, and reviewer of mystery novels for the Boston Globe. The advice that was the most helpful for the revision of my WIP was the section on turning points.

At first I focused on plot points. Although these are essential, they didn't pull my story together. It wasn't until I returned home from the workshop that I was able to pull out three turning points, each of them making my story go in a different direction. The fourth and final turning point is the confrontation between the protagonist and the villain but I had that scene more or less clear in my head. It was the other three turning points I needed to focus my revision.

I could foreshadow the next turning point, build towards it, and cut out scenes that didn't contribute to dramatic tension and cause and effect. All the meandering side-stepping dropped away. I chopped off extra scenes without a single regret because I kept working towards the turning points.

I doubt whether I'll ever map out a novel as Hallie Ephron suggests in her book on writing but I will look out for the turning points in my first drafts so my revision zigzags to the climax in style.

Pauline

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