If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our July author interviews: Ellen Byerrum (7/5), Day of the Dark anthology authors (7/12 and 7/19), and Nancy Cole Silverman (7/26).

Saturday Guest Bloggers in July: 7/1--Fran Stewart, and 7/8--Nancy Cole Silverman. WWK Saturday bloggers write on 7/15--Margaret S. Hamilton, 7/22--Kait Carson, and 7/29--E. B. Davis.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.”

In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on October, 18, 2017. Look for the interview by E. B. Davis here on that date!

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Monday, October 1, 2012

Enthusiasms

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forgetthebox.net
I’ve spent two years writing my current WIP. It’s been a slow process because I worked with a critique group in which the four of us reviewed our work twenty pages at a time. My work is about 300 pages, divided by twenty pages equals twelve weeks, times four writers equals 48 weeks, plus vacations and holidays. Then, the time compounded by two members dropping out and being replaced by two new members so we started back at the beginning—it’s been two long years.

Before the summer started, I read my work in its entirety, made notes on revisions and then stopped. It wasn’t the summer disruption, but writing short stories that took me away from my WIP. For my efforts, one has already been published, “An Acidic Solution” in the anthology, He Had It Coming, and I received notice from publisher Linda Fisher of Mozark Press that my short story “No Hair Day” will be published in the next Shaker of Margaritas: Bad Hair Day anthology due out by Thanksgiving. I have no regrets about taking time off from my WIP because of those successes, although one of my shorts was rejected, but I have two more that I’m in the process of completing for submission, so maybe I’ll get lucky with the next ones too.

But, it’s been four months since I’ve worked on my WIP, and I’ve decided to turn one of my shorts into a novel, which at the moment—I’m plotting. The new novel excites me. The only part I haven’t worked out yet is how it ends. It is this enthusiasm that draws me to write short stories. I usually spend about a month on one short; one week writing, a week revising, a week submitting to my critique group, the last week perfecting the story. Then, I’m ready for a new enthusiasm.

In my earlier years, I read psychology books. One sentence I read confounded me. In effect, it said that feelings are fleeting. At the time, I wanted to balk at the notion because it connoted superficiality, and I admired substance. My friends were few, but ones I’d kept for years. My feelings for them and family weren’t fleeting. But now, I find myself waxing apathetic about my WIP. I’m wondering if my fleeting feelings about my work and escaping into shorts indicates superficiality, which I equate to unprofessional conduct.

I’ve written three manuscripts in full and submitted one to agents. I know I have the wherewithal to finish what I start. And yet, I want to put my WIP on the hold shelf and start the new novel, which is a traditional mystery and which may have a wider market than my WIP, a supernatural mystery. I’m kicking myself. If the current WIP hadn’t taken so dang long to write would I feel this lack of enthusiasm for it? I’m wondering if I don’t write the new novel, will my enthusiasm for it wan, which I don’t want to happen. Am I that superficial and unprofessional?

www.visuality-group.co.uk/flake
And, after I finish the two shorts I’m working on now, I have one more to write before the holidays. How much can I get done and which one should I work on first? In a way, it’s a happy dilemma, and yet whatever I do, I want to follow through and be a professional. Writing is a profession, but there are aspects of it that resemble wanderlust, echo of mystic callings and sensor to a muse.

I sound like a flake. Do you allow your feelings to determine your work?  

8 comments:

James Montgomery Jackson said...

Congrats on the short story publication credits.

With so many potential projects, I suggest working on the ones that call to you. You'll put hour heart into them and it will show.

That's not to say that you won't have to do hard work, but if you believe in the project, that effort will be more joyful than work.

~ Jim

E. B. Davis said...

That's what I'm doing, Jim. My WIP I can always return to at a later date. Whether I'll do so or not, time will determine. I feel as if I've wasted two years of my time. Yes, I've learned a lot, but I'm that much further away from getting a novel published. This time, I'm writing the rough draft by myself so it doesn't take so darn long!

Alyx Morgan said...

I totally understand feeling like you're flaky for flitting from project to project, EB (pardon the alliteration). I agree with Jim, though. Do the ones that call to you, because maybe the other ones need to percolate a little longer.

E. B. Davis said...

Glad to see you're not having google/blogger issues like the rest of the WWK bloggers. It maybe that my WIP must percolate more, but I'm wondering if I want a supernatural as my first book? I think after I get the first traditional mystery published, then I'd feel more secure having a supernatural published. I'm sort of using Sue Jaffarian as an example, an author I love who first did traditional, then supernatural and then paranormal (but I like reading all three).

Polly Iyer said...

If you're excited about the new story, that's where I'd suggest you go. Sometimes you can work on a story so long that it's like beating a dead horse. I'm not saying the book you've spent so much time and energy on should be shelved, but putting it aside while you work on something that has your full interest may be what you need to look at it later with a fresh eye. There's always a little disappointment when you don't finish something you've started, and I think that's why you feel let down. I always look at things in a broader sense. Think of what you learned writing that first book? Think of how you'll apply that to the next book. But most of all, you should make a decision not to be sidelined with other ventures. Stay with it. Remember my offer.

E. B. Davis said...

This is my third script. I finished the other two. The first one of course is on my hard drive and will never see the light of day. The second one I marketed and got some bites, but no takers, which was why this manuscript was so important. The length of time it's taken, though, has taken its toll. I'd like to finish it--at some point. But now I've got all these ideas flowing and I'm taking Kris Neri's plotting course, which has really helped organize my thoughts, so I'm getting it all on paper, organizing all the plot points, etc. I'm ON. At least if I could put blogging on the shelf for a few weeks!

Linda Rodriguez said...

EB, you've finished the first draft on your WIP, so there's no problem with writing the first draft of the novel that's calling you. Revision is often best done after a nice long break from the original book, anyway.

That sense of finishing what you start to consider yourself a professional is really about the first draft. We all have dozens of tantalizing new ideas come up when we're struggling with the muddled middle. That's the time to just write them down on the side and keep on trucking until you finish that draft. If you're writing a new project's first draft while the old one's resting and you're gaining distance on it, you're being professional still--as long as you finish that second project's first draft!

E. B. Davis said...

What would I do without you, Linda. Thank you sooo much for saying that. I'll get back to it, but I have to move forward with the new project. The straight jacket has been removed.