If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our May author interviews: Marla Cooper-5/3, Rhys Bowen-5/10, Cindy Brown-5/17, Martha Reed-5/24, Sherry Harris--5/31.

Saturday Guest Bloggers in May--Paty Jager-5/6 and Maren Anderson-5/13. WWK Saturday bloggers write on 5/20--Margaret S. Hamilton and on 5/27--Kait Carson. E. B. Davis blogs this month on 5/30.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.”

In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on October, 18, 2017. Look for the interview by E. B. Davis here on that date!

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, August 5, 2011

Report from Christchurch



Report from Christchurch

The earthquakes continue frequently. Most are too small to feel. I’ve seen the downtown where several areas are still blocked off. I know the destroyed building only from pictures. People who live here say they are heartbroken to see the magnificent cathedral and other classic buildings fallen, standing as structural skeletons or red-tagged for demolition. Many people are still in temporary structures without bathrooms or heating. Many temporary offices are in tent labeled AFT which stands for “Another Frigging Tent.”

Over the weekend we had the coldest temperatures and the most snow in 19 years. The University of Canterbury, schools and most businesses were closed. Police advised people to stay home. Many of those who did not heed the warning spun and slid on icy streets, driving too fast and recklessly for conditions Locals called this, “The icing on the earthquake.”

Workers told me, “It makes a change from shoveling silt to shoveling snow.” Although some people saw the snow as just one more burden, children seemed to enjoy it, making snowmen and having snowball fights. Other people said the snow renewed their sense of purpose.






Christchurch is in that long slow painful phase known as recovery. Much that was lost will never return, many tough decisions have to be made and additional losses are bound to occur. At the same time, small victories are occurring. Favorite restaurants and stores are reopening in safer areas. People enjoy rediscovering them. Bus lines are expanding fitfully into their former territory. People share their stories of loss and survival. They also talk about rebuilding and their hopes for the future.

The university has maps indicating which buildings are closed, where to assemble if/when another serious quake occurs and where to find security staff. A bank branch and a bus line terminal once on campus are closed. Some visiting professors cancelled their visits but others have come instead.

World cup rugby and city-wide art festivals are optimistically planned for later this year. Life goes on.

2 comments:

E. B. Davis said...

You're in New Zealand at a pivotal time, Warren. Without having to experience the horror of an earthquake, you are witnessing the regeneration. Seems that they have a sardonic sense of humour, which will see them through.

There's just nothing you can do about natural events but cope. I remember seeing Pompeii, Italy--the remains of a family encased by lava, the mother and father trying to protect their child within their embrace--for naught.

Human instincts remain the same regardless of time.

Kara Cerise said...

When I read about the children who enjoyed the snow and the festivals planned for this year despite everything Mother Nature has thrown at Christchurch, I thought of the quote, "Hope springs eternal."