If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our July author interviews: Ellen Byerrum (7/5), Day of the Dark anthology authors (7/12 and 7/19), and Nancy Cole Silverman (7/26).

Saturday Guest Bloggers in July: 7/1--Fran Stewart, and 7/8--Nancy Cole Silverman. WWK Saturday bloggers write on 7/15--Margaret S. Hamilton, 7/22--Kait Carson, and 7/29--E. B. Davis.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.”

In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on October, 18, 2017. Look for the interview by E. B. Davis here on that date!

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Tuesday, June 21, 2011

One Man's Trash


“Have you noticed anything unusual in Jane Bond’s trash? Do you see a large number of empty beer cans or wine bottles in her recycle bin?” These are questions I am repeatedly asked when one of my neighbors is undergoing a background check for a government job. When I was new to the DC metro area, I didn’t know that it was business as usual for an agent to knock on the door, flip his or her government ID badge and then ask a series of questions about a neighbor. The questions vary but I am always asked about trash.

After that first rather unsettling interview, I surreptitiously strolled down the street and checked out my neighbors’ garbage. (I did this out of curiosity and not nosiness you understand.) In one recycle bin I saw a Pampers for Swaddlers wrapper. Their baby wasn’t due for a few weeks so the baby was either premature or they had visitors. I’ll have to give them a call. In another recycle bin I noticed a number of empty tequila bottles belonging to a couple who don’t normally drink. Must have had a Cinco de Mayo party and I wasn’t invited. Hmmm In front of a third house there was a large amount of bagged trash piled on the curb. Perhaps their college bound son had the unenviable chore of tossing his cherished clutter. Poor guy.

Trash isn’t something I had ever thought about but obviously some people consider it a treasure trove of information because it can reveal a lot about a person’s lifestyle and habits. Now, whenever I put out my trash I wonder… Who is observing the contents of my trash bags and overflowing recycle bin? What conclusions are they drawing about me? Could something that one neighbor notices in another neighbor’s trash lead to murder?

The tales the trash can tell led me to consider the contents of my heroine’s and villain’s garbage. My single mother heroine would recycle her empty macaroni boxes and soup cans while my older male villain would throw away his cigar butts, pill bottles and broken machine gun magazines. What’s in your characters’ trash?

5 comments:

E. B. Davis said...

I live in the DC area too, and I have been questioned about my neighbors for their security clearance. But I've never been asked about their trash! It must be the current administration. The last time I was questioned was under Bush.

Good question, though. Under rules by the state of NC, my character Abby must recycle her wine and champagne bottles, which I do mention. But the victim's trash...you given me an idea.

Kara Cerise said...

I was surprised when first questioned about my neighbor's trash since it's something I try to avoid especially in the hot months. But as a writer it did make me think. I'm glad that it gave you an idea!

Warren Bull said...

Oh no, Kara's first blog and she writes something "trashy." I know the police don't need a search warrant to look through whatever a suspect has voluntarily discarded. A character might threw something in someone else's trash to try to blame and innocent person. Hmmmm.

Pauline Alldred said...

If characters have bloody clothes or a weapon, they can't put them in the trash. Should they bury them--not in the backyard or a nosy neighbor is going to ask what's being planted. Should they drive for miles and discard incriminating evidence in the woods? Police can check their mileage and GPS. What about in a commercial trash can or the trash of someone who lives miles away? Better do it at 3 in the morning because my trash stays close to my house under a window and I take it to the local recycling place once a week.

Ramona said...

Now I'm paranoid about my garbage and what it says about me.