If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our May author interviews: Marla Cooper-5/3, Rhys Bowen-5/10, Cindy Brown-5/17, Martha Reed-5/24, Sherry Harris--5/31.

Saturday Guest Bloggers in May--Paty Jager-5/6 and Maren Anderson-5/13. WWK Saturday bloggers write on 5/20--Margaret S. Hamilton and on 5/27--Kait Carson. E. B. Davis blogs this month on 5/30.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.”

In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on October, 18, 2017. Look for the interview by E. B. Davis here on that date!

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Interview With Camille Minichino




I have the pleasure of knowing Camille Minichino through my local SinC chapter.  She's an amazing woman who has been writing mysteries since 1997, and is on her third series, The Periodic Table Mysteries.  The series' third book--A Function of Murder--came out in December:




Dr. Sophie Knowles is a math professor with a knack for creating complex puzzles that delight her students. But now, at the close of the academic year, she must solve a crime that doesn’t quite add up… 






Please join me in welcoming Camille Minichino!

  1. At what point did you get serious about your writing, and why was that the critical point?
    I wrote a book on nuclear waste management when I worked for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. I had a strong reaction to my name on the spine and wanted more! I quickly realized that--although waste management problems were exciting to me--the book would not reach a very wide audience, so came up with a more fascinating topic. It hasn't been as easy as I thought, but I do have more readers now.
  2. Are you a "plotter" or a "pantser?"
    Definitely a pantser. I want to be in that corner with my character, trying to get out. If I'm tense about how a particular clue is going to pan out, then my character will be, also, and the writing will reflect that. Sometimes at the 80% mark I start to panic and vow that next time, I'll outline. But I forget pain easily. My only discipline is that I keep on track and meet my contract deadlines (see below for device!).
  3. In addition to your Sophie Knowles mysteries, you're also a professor, an accomplished miniaturist, AND you write two other series.  How do you find time to get it all in?
    I'm good at using small pieces of time—even 5 or 10 minutes between meetings can be productive if I use the period to reconnect with one of my projects/jobs. That might mean reading one sentence and tightening it, or making a format adjustment. Anything to keep the projects at the front of my mind. Or, if I can't sleep I get up and do something like this, instead of tossing around. I love checking off a "To-Do" item at two in the morning!
  4. What do you like most about writing mysteries?
    With mysteries, there's no struggle with plotting. The structure is given to you, especially in my "cozy" sub-genre. Sure you have to have twists and turns, but essentially you need a killer, a body, a sleuth, and suspects. I do read a lot of "literary" fiction, where there are no requirements like that (not even for resolution at the end); I like reading it, but imagine it would be very hard to write. With mysteries, I also get to work out any frustrations by simply putting them in the book.
  5. Walk us through your writing process: Do you have a certain day or time of day that you write?  Do you have a separate room in your house dedicated to you and your writing?
    I'm lucky enough to have my own office and a great setup, thanks to my uber-techie husband. I have a large computer monitor, a TV next to it, and all the peripherals. Best of all, if I have a problem, I send him in and get a cup of coffee. I don't keep a routine schedule; some say Gemini’s are like that. It's true for me—I write whenever and still manage to meet deadlines. For my novels, I keep an Excel spreadsheet with a plot of Words vs. Days so I'll be able to see my progress at a glance.
  6. Do you have any agenda when you write?
    I'm glad you asked. Of course, character and story are prime, but I must admit that all my books (currently working on #19) reflect my philosophy, opinions, and values, in some way. In the first series, I wanted to show the readers a female physicist you would like to have lunch with, and science as a fun, rewarding area of study. My most favorite "fan" letters come from people who say they never thought they'd understand science, but now they feel they do. With the miniature mysteries, I wanted to give an insight into the world of crafts, how they're not just time-fillers, but ways for people to come together to produce something beautiful or interesting, often for charity. My third series--academic mysteries--are set on a college campus much like the one where I spent many years. Writing about faculty senates and student crises, and exposing some of the interesting pettiness that goes on in the Ivory Tower has been the most fun!

    Thanks for letting me visit, Alyx!
It's been my pleasure, Camille!  Thanks for stopping by here at WWK!


For those who would like to purchase the book, or find out more on this amazing lady, you can either click on the book, which will link you to her website, or click here.
 

10 comments:

James Montgomery Jackson said...

Camille,

While you claim to be a pantser, I see you are very organized otherwise--something a lot of pantsers seem to eschew as too limiting. I mirror you like that, but what I do not have is your ability to grab the odd few minutes for writing. For whatever reason, I need to settle in to allow words to flow.

Or maybe that's the excuse I tell myself. Thanks for joining us today.

~ Jim

Camille Minichino said...

It's great to be on Writers Who Kill, an easy visit thanks to Alyx's leading questions!

Warren Bull said...

Thanks for stopping by WWK. I get to learn about interesting authors by reading the blog. Both of my sisters have done research and so has my wife. I'm glad to see another woman who finds science fascination.

Gloria Alden said...

Although I'm not a scientist, I've always been interested in science, and as an elementary teacher I made sure my students got a good background in it. We did lots of hands on science activities, and my science center was full of bones, fossils, insects, bird's nests, snake skins, etc.

I haven't read your science series, but I would like to read them.

Anonymous said...

URepubaCamille,

It all sounds so easy when you talk about it. But as a writer and artist,I know how difficult it can be to practice two disciplines. You always amaze me.

Bette Lamb

Camille Minichino said...

Good for you, Gloria; your students were very lucky.

Bette, I am not the artist you are! I dabble, you're a pro.

Bette Golden Lamb said...

Camille,

You are way too modest. Your work is beautiful!

Bette Lamb

Heather Haven said...

I have adored Camille ever since she sought me out at Book Passage eoght years ago. She thought I needed some tea and a little boosting up. Camille was one of the reasons I continued to write mysteries, she and Sheldon siegel, and I will never forget her kindness to me. On another note, I've been reading her work for years, and it is first rate!

Terry Shames said...

Camille, thanks for this great interview (Alyx I loved your questions). I've always wondered how Camille does so much and does it successfully. I'm going to take note of the idea of using those little bits of time wisely.

E. B. Davis said...

You must be extremely dedicated to your work, which I admire. I'd like to learn how you do it. Being a pantser seems to contradict the scientific method! That surprised me, but then you must at least have a mental outline when writing to use your time efficiently, and to do all you do, that's a given. Thanks for giving your time to WWK. Great interview, Alyx.