If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our September Author Interviews--9/6 Kathleen Valenti, 9/13 David Burnsworth, 9/20 Jeri Westerson, 9/27 Frances Brody. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.

September Saturday Guest Bloggers: 9/2--Anne Bannon, 9/9 WWK Bloggers, 9/16 Margaret S. Hamilton, 9/23 Kait Carson, and on 9/30 Trixie Stiletto.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.” In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.
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Monday, June 11, 2012

Guilty

Although my religious background is Christian, I’m a firm believer in karma. Of course, the Christian version of karma is, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

This blog promotes my writing and exercises my writing skills outside of fiction. It also has enabled me to interview many authors. In my first year of writing for this blog, I learned that I needed to read the books of those I interview. It’s time consuming. When I hadn’t read the authors’ books, I focused the interview so that I didn’t give my opinion of  their books. The problem with that, of course, is that by interviewing an author, the interview itself becomes an endorsement. So I made a rule not to interview anyone whose work I hadn’t read. I’ve also reviewed books on this blog that I’ve read and loved regardless of interviewing the author. In short, I try to promote good writers and good books here.

When I’m not writing, revising my own work or doing “real” work, I read—a lot. It goes with the territory of being a writer. That’s where my writing started—by reading other writers work. Since I got a Kindle, I beg Amazon gift cards when asked what I want for presents (we’re the practical sort). I’ve downloaded the work of authors I know and don’t know. In hardcopy, I usually try new authors at the library before buying their work. But “in these times of municipal-fiscal austerity” my library doesn’t carry many new authors. So, I have downloaded works that I sometimes love (and interview the author, such as in the case of Ellen Elizabeth Hunter) or wish I hadn’t downloaded, reconciling my expense as a gamble.

What I haven’t done, and feel guilty by my lacking, is providing reviews of books I’ve read online. Time is an issue for me, but it is for other writers as well, so that doesn’t pardon my lapse. Online reviews help sell books and further the careers of new authors. On venues such as Amazon, reviews can make or break a book. I admit that when a book on Amazon has five stars behind it and many reviews have averaged that five star rating, I’m inclined to buy the book. When a book only has two stars, I don’t hit the buy button unless I know the author or the rating comprises one review—then I think about it.

I’ve made a new rule for myself. I won’t write a bad review. Withholding my negative opinion will decrease the amount of reviews a book receives and that in and of itself negatively impacts sales. But—because I haven’t provided online reviews for books that I’ve loved—I’ve inadvertently and negatively impacted the book and the author’s career producing bad karma for myself.

I hope that exposing readers here to new authors and that writing reviews online for other new writers—they in turn will take the time to do the same for me. My blogging hasn’t been intentionally to get just as much as I receive because it all depends on whether or not I deliver a good product worth reading. But if I can write a worthwhile entertaining novel, then I fully hope my good intentions will motivate and deserve others’ time to do the same for me.

Have you written an online review for a new author today? If not, get cracking!

11 comments:

Polly said...

Elaine, as one who has benefited from your support, I say hear, hear! You were the first person to host my alter ego, and you've been supportive of my work both on your blog and personally. I know authors who have said in other venues that they loved one of my books, but they didn't write a review. As an author, they should know how important a good review is, so I don't understand their reluctance to write one. I try to give either a four or five star review to new authors, or I don't give any. But if a book is good, I feel it's our duty to share the information.

E. B. Davis said...

It is hard for new authors to get reviewed by real book reviewers so providing reviews of good new books is important. Like anything, if a book becomes popular, then it garners all the traditional reviews, but it has to get a little grassroot support before that can happen.

I'm really busy. It seems as if at any given time, I am juggling three tasks. But--reviewing books for Goodreads, libraries and online at selling venues such as Amazon is too important to put off.

I will try to compose at least two small reviews per week from now on.

Warren Bull said...

I am one of those "new authors" with only a few reviews. Although I have some really good reviews as blurbs for my books and on websites, reviewers often don't also post in more than one place so Goodreads and Amazon doesn't include all my reviews.

In my reviews and interviews I try to focus on positive aspects of the writing.

Linda Rodriguez said...

EB, thanks for writing about this. I wasn't aware how important these online reviews at Goodreads, Amazon, and Barnes & Noble were until recently. I have had so many people email or write in comments here and elsewhere that they loved EVERY LAST SECRET--and I'm delighted!--but they don't write even the shortest review on one of those big three online sites. Meanwhile, someone on Goodreads who says in her review that she read hardly any of the book (because she didn't like the character's name!) blasts it in a review with one star. *sigh*

Warren Bull said...

Linda I got a two star review on Goodreads from a woman who made positive comments about my writing and dialog. She said she thought the title of Murder Manhattan Style was "misleading" because the book did not describe the Manhattan she imagined it would based on the title. If you're not supposed to judge a book by its cover, should you judge it by its title?

Thank you for your review of my book.

E. B. Davis said...

Polly, Warren and Linda--my apologies. I've read most of your books and have failed to post online reviews. Perhaps I should just list all the authors that I need to apologise to (although I doubt that I'll remember everyone.

Polly Iyer
Warren Bull
Linda Rodrigues
Ellis Vidler
Kelly Cochran
Peg Cochran
Kait Carson
Edie Claire
Michele Drier
Lesley Diehl
Jana DeLeon
Paula DuMond
Kate George
Kaye George
Sasscer Hill
Cathryn Grant
Marilyn Levinson
Elaine Orr

Wow! I have a lot of online reviews to write--I will--I promise!

Linda Rodriguez said...

EB, since I learned of the importance of this, I've been going through writing a review a day for books and authors I've read and loved. My list is much longer than yours, so don't feel bad! We just do what we can.

Linda Rodriguez said...

Warren, at least she READ your book! This person thought Skeet's name was stupid, so she shut the book and wrote a review.

Thanks for your support, as well.

Valerie Bonham said...

I hadn't thought about blogging in the light of grassroots support for books, but it's a logical conclusion. Thanks for the nudge.

E. B. Davis said...

We have to support each other, Valerie. Most often the first readers are other writers, so if we review the books online, it will help other readers buy books. Isn't selling and developing a good reputation what we seek?

Linda and Warren--one reviewer won't make or break your books. "Skeet" is a cute name, Linda, and I found the duality of your Manhattans refreshing Warren. And there is a Philadelphia, Mississippi. So why not two Manhattans?

Warren Bull said...

As long as we are apologizing, I have to apologize for not thanking Kim Williams for her review. Thank you. Kim.

I love the name "Skeet" and she's a great character.