If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book next year, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

WWK welcomes Welcome Wednesday author interview guests--Edith Maxwell (writing as Maddie Day) 11/4, Elizabeth Duncan 11/11, and J. A. Hennrickus (writing as Julianne Holmes) 11/25, to our blog. Polly Iyer is filling in for us on 11/18 due to a delayed publication. Thanks, Polly! Our guest bloggers this month are--Sam Bohrman (11/7) and Pat Gulley (11/14) in addition to our steadfast Saturday bloggers, Sam Morton (11/21), and Kait Carson (11/28).

Kait's blog will be our last in 2015. Warren Bull will introduce the holiday season on 11/29. Gloria Alden, KM Rockwood, Shari Randall, E. B. Davis, and Paula Gail Benson will present holiday shorts among the holidays. Please look at our 2015 Guest Calendar for December dates. We will resume blogging on 1/3/16.

Maria Barbo at HarperCollins's Katherine Tegen Books has bought a debut YA fantasy by Sarah Henning, tentatively titled Heartless and pitched as the never-before-told origin story of the sea witch from Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid" told in the vein of Wicked – from the villainess's point of view. Publication is set for fall 2017; Rachel Ekstrom at the Irene Goodman Literary Agency did the deal for world rights. Congratulations, Sarah! --Publishers Weekly 11/9/15

Gloria Alden released the sixth book in her Catherine Jewell mystery series. Carnations for Cornelia is available at Amazon. Congratulations, Gloria.

Congratulations to WWK's Carla Damron. Carla's book, The Stone Necklace, will be released on February 2, 2016. Pat Conroy served as Carla's editor on this project. For further information, look on Facebook or Amazon.

Warren Bull's "When Stinking Aliens Take Over Your Planet" appears in the new Whortleberry Press anthology, Strange Mysteries 6. "The Interview" was chosen to appear in the Flash Bang Mysteries anthology. The anthologies are available on Amazon in paper or Kindle formats.

"A Matter of Honor" by Robert Dugoni and Paula Gail Benson will be published in the first Killer Nashville anthology, KILLER NASHVILLE NOIR: COLD BLOODED, released on October 27, 2015.


Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Pantster or Plotter?

I’m a pantster. I can’t help it. I want to be a plotter, but it doesn’t work for me. I like surprises. If I already know what’s going to happen in my book, then I’m bored. I have tried being a plotter several times—at many people’s suggestions, but it doesn’t work for me. I don’t know if it has something to do with that left brain/right brain thing or what.

I have to have scenes running through my head. But then I decide it doesn’t work. So then another scene plows through my brain. Like my WIP, Ellagrace is a widow of a scandalous man who died in the arms of the town madam. He left her in disgrace, penniless, house in foreclosure and she suspects his girlfriend forged her name on many documents. 

She finds a job working at a small newspaper taking obituaries and farm news. When she learns she’s the owner of a house the madam had done business out of before high tailing it out of town, she figures she can sell the house, or rent it out. No way would she ever live there. But then someone torches the house.

One of my co-workers told me about a student who told her about her mother’s deceased husband and a bunch of Viagra bottles left behind in a barn or somewhere. I’m thinking those are good items to leave notes in.

While I don’t know anyone who has gone through this, I have known women whose husbands have left them for other women, spent all their money and left them with the bills, and gave them good reasons for wanting to murder the men. But they didn’t.

In a mystery, we have to kill someone off. And then we have to discover the way and how of the murders. It must be so much easier if you’re a plotter. I wish my brain would turn into a plotter, but it refuses to cooperate no matter how much I beg.

How do you handle this? Are you a plotter


Polly said...

I'm a pantster, so I'm with you, Dee. I haven't even made an effort to plot because part of the fun in writing is finding out what happens to my characters as I write their story. I have a general idea where I want to wind up, but the road traveled is more fun if you don't know the directions.

Warren Bull said...

Don't worry so much about it. Two of my favorite authors, Nancy Pickard and Carolyn Hart do not plan either. For that matter, neither do I. In my longer work I use a timeline of major events just for sequence but I never know who's going to do what until they let me in on it.

E. B. Davis said...

I start out by knowing my beginning and ending. From there I do both approaches to get from Point A to Point Z. I'll make up a loose storyboard for a chapter and then start writing. A lot of things can happen, but I aim to include the points I outlined. Anything extra is a bonus that I can build on and may change the path I take to get to Point Z.

Pauline Alldred said...

I know the main crime and who did it and then I start writing with the characters that are going to be most involved. The main character, the main crime and who did it can all change. I do a sketchy plot for parts that are confused or where I'm not sure how to get from there to here.