WWK has guest blogs available in November. If you are interesting in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

WWK welcomes Maggie Toussaint 5/20, Alan Cupp 5/27, Janet Cantrell (Kaye George) 6/3, Linda Reilly 6/10, Editor Ramona Long 6/17, and Sherry Harris 6/24 to our blog. Look for their interviews on Welcome Wednesdays.
Our guest bloggers this month are--Anna Castle 5/30, Vicki Batman 6/6, and Edith Maxwell 6/13.

Congratulations to Karen Pullen, editor of Carolina Crimes: 19 Tales of Lust, Love, and Longing. The anthology has been nominated for an Anthony Award. WWK blogger E. B. Davis's "Ice Cream Allure" is contained in this anthology!


Congratulations to Paula Gail Benson and James M. Jackson for their stories in the third Guppy anthology Fish or Cut Bait, now available from Wildside Press.

Congratulations to James M. Jackson!
Jim's Seamus McCree novel, Ant Farm, was chosen for the Kindle Select program. When it is available, we'll post a link here!
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Friday, May 22, 2015

An Odd Meeting

                                                 

                                                         An Odd Meeting

I recently attended a meeting where I got the impression that roughly 90% of the

people did not understand the point of the meeting.  There was one item on the

agenda for discussion.  I could see that the decision we made about that item would

directly affect the long-term identity and purpose of the group. 

It seemed to me that people were discussing the item as if a simple yea or nay would

settle the matter.  It was a “but we’ve always done it this way,” moment. 

It reminded me of times I saw a family in therapy when there was a specific event a

child/adolescent wanted to go to and the arguments pro and con were in nearly

perfect balance.  As a therapist, I was much less interested in deciding about the

single event than in developing way to resolve such question that would apply to the

event and be useful for other resolving other issues when they came up.  Often in

those circumstances some family members thought that deciding whether or not the

child should go was the only goal.

I also remember once trying to help my son with his math problems.  He wanted

only to get answers for the homework problems.  He wanted them done as quickly

as possible.  One of his strategies was to guess several numbers in a row.  He was not

happy that I did not simply tell him the answer.  My goal was to teach him a method

of solving the problems that could be useful with similar problems.  Our opposing

goals frustrated both of us. 

I will share my observations with the group because I care about what happens to it.

Wish me luck.


Have you ever had a similar experience?