If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Our reason for creating WWK originated as an outlet for our love of reading and writing mystery fiction. We hope you love it, too, and will enjoy our holiday gifts to our readers with original short stories to celebrate the season. Starting on 11/16 stories by Warren Bull, Margaret S. Hamilton, Paula Gail Benson, Linda Rodriguez, KM Rockwood, Gloria Alden, and E. B. Davis will appear every Thursday into the New Year.


Our November Author Interviews: 11/8--Ellen Byron, and 11/15--Sujata Massey. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


November Saturday Bloggers: 11/4 Margaret S. Hamilton and 11/11 Cheryl Hollon.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," just published, will appear in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.


James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Thursday, December 23, 2010

CHRISTMAS, PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

First, from Writers Who Kill, happy holidays, whatever the holiday, and best wishes for the New Year.

clip_image001I spent the last few days preparing to submit to fifteen agents. The busyness of this time of the year distracts me from right-brain thinking so I’m not opening up my next novel in my missing person series or the two short stories I’ve started. Instead, I’m thinking as though I’m applying for a job by studying agents, agencies, and their clients. Hopefully, my subconscious is busy on the vague images and ideas that need development for my next WIP and for my short stories.

Sometimes I wonder if the magic of Christmas decreases after a person reaches five years of age because by then, a person forms recoverable memories. She holds in her mind an image of imperfection and disappointment.

I consider myself lucky that my parents weren’t equipped economically or emotionally to let me think I should get what I want always or that someone else could provide me with happiness. I’m not sure I ever had an ideal image of Christmas.

Today, I think much about Christmases experienced by others. I can’t shake images of children in Third World countries who need a sugary peanut concoction to avoid stunted growth and intellectual retardation. Mothers in Africa and India can expect to lose some of their babies. How terrible is that?

The peace and goodwill message of Christmas seems an unrealized ideal. I’ll spend Christmas with my children and grandchildren, and enjoy that. But, unless a person is an extreme introvert, it’s impossible to remain happy for long. We keep trying to improve the situation but we seem destined not to see the finished product.

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Perhaps our finiteclip_image002 perspective gives us a reason to create stories, dreams captured in black and white, temporary satisfactions or insights.

Congratulations to all those authors published this year and here’s wishing for success for those seeking publication in the coming year.

6 comments:

Warren Bull said...

I know there is a story in your bitter-sweet experience of Christmas. I am trying to rehab a story I heard in a Christmas sermon that was seriously warped in the telling.

E. B. Davis said...

Congratulations on getting to the query stage with at least one of your WIPs, Pauline.

Although a theological discussion isn't appropriate, I will say that Christmas isn't about ideals. It's about hope despite the sins and vulgarities of this world.

Merry Christmas!

Pauline Alldred said...

Good luck with the warped-told story, Warren. I have many Christmas stories, my own and from my experience as an RN, but they're not happy. People keep on dying and going to war in December.

Hope, yes, it's what makes us hold onto life no matter what.

This is not Christmas talk.

Warren Bull said...

Pauline, I'm convinced nurses kept me alive through Christmas a couple of years ago.

Jillian said...

Merry Christmas to all of you on this blog that gives me joy. I may not post every day, but know you have a loyal reader.

E. B. Davis said...

Thanks Jillian--Have a great Christmas. Talk with you after the New Year!