If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our June author interviews: Fish Out of Water Authors--6/7, Susan Van Kirk--6/14, Renee Patrick--6/21, and Joanne Guidoccio--6/28.

Saturday Guest Bloggers in June: 6/3--Geoffrey Mehl, 6/10--Joan Leotta. WWK Saturday bloggers write on 6/17--Margaret S. Hamilton and on 6/24--Kait Carson.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.”

In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on October, 18, 2017. Look for the interview by E. B. Davis here on that date!

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, April 7, 2017

In a Lonely Place by Dorothy B. Hughes: A Review by Warren Bull



In a Lonely Place by Dorothy B. Hughes: A Review by Warren Bull


In a Lonely Place was published in 1947.  In 1949 it was made into a noir film staring Humphrey Bogart, which is considered by many to be a classic even though the film deviated considerably from the novel.

In a Lonely Place was one of the first novels told from the point-of-view of the criminal. In my opinion it is successful in conveying the story from that point-of view.  It is chilling without being gory. None of the actual murders were described as they happened. But the book maintains an atmosphere of menace. I am reminded of the shower scene in the movie Psycho. In that scene the viewer never sees the knife make contact with the victim, but it is shocking nonetheless to see the results of the stabbing.

By the way, if you are interested in the development of crime fiction over time, Jim Thompson’s The Killer Inside Me, another excellent work from a murderer’s point of view, was published in 1952. 
Dortohy B. Hughes gives a believable account of the criminal’s thoughts and emotions. As a reader I felt the drive the criminal feels toward committing murder. I did not find the killer likeable, but I could understand, at least at a minimal level, the actions that he took.


This is not a who-done-it. It is more of a how-are-they-going-to-catch-him book. It is very skillfully written. The tension builds throughout. If you want to understand how to write suspense, this would be a good book to study. I recommend it highly.

4 comments:

Gloria Alden said...

Warren, another good book review from you. I'd never heard of this book before or the movie.

KM Rockwood said...

This sounds like an early example of psychological suspense, a genre that I love. I will have to see if I can find a copy. Thanks for pointing it out.

Kaye George said...

I adore the writing of Dorothy B. Hughes. Thanks for this review. I haven't read this one.

Greatest essay said...

A good book review as usual. Your reviews help me to choose the right book for reading. Thank you for sharing a selection of books for reading.