If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Our reason for creating WWK originated as an outlet for our love of reading and writing mystery fiction. We hope you love it, too, and will enjoy our holiday gifts to our readers with original short stories to celebrate the season. Starting on 11/16 stories by Warren Bull, Margaret S. Hamilton, Paula Gail Benson, Linda Rodriguez, KM Rockwood, Gloria Alden, and E. B. Davis will appear every Thursday into the New Year.


Our November Author Interviews: 11/8--Ellen Byron, and 11/15--Sujata Massey. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


November Saturday Bloggers: 11/4 Margaret S. Hamilton and 11/11 Cheryl Hollon.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," just published, will appear in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.


James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Friday, February 10, 2017

Death in a White Tie by Ngaio Marsh: A Review by Warren Bull



Death in a White Tie by Ngaio Marsh: A Review by Warren Bull
Image from Wickapedia

Death in a White Tie was published in 1938. It was recommended to me while I was on tour in Ngaio’s home in Christchurch, New Zealand. I very much enjoyed both the tour and the novel.
            It starts when Roderick Alleyn’s mother, Lady Alleyn, announces that she will get involved in the ”coming out” of young women being presented to society this season in London.  She has promised to chaperone one of the young women. One of the women presenting a debutante comes to the Chief Detective-Inspector to ask for help for “a friend” who is being blackmailed. The woman says she cannot reveal the reason “her friend” pays the money.  The woman is a close family friend, which makes the matter more personal to Alleyn.
            Chief Detective-Inspector Alleyn requests the help of a friend, Lord Robert Gospell affectionately known as Bunchy, who has aided investigations in the past. The man is genuinely liked and respected by other members of the social elite. He often helps those women who find it hard to fit in to the social swim join the activities. While Bunchy is on the phone with Alleyn conveying information aobut the blackmail someone enters the room so Bunchy ends the call. Shortly after that Bunchy is killed, which leaves Alleyn feeling guilty for involving him in the investigation. The policeman has to  struggle to contain his rage.
            The author describes the elite of society and the “coming out” of young women with assurance and knowledge of that social class. Her social commentary is woven seamlessly into the story. As with other novels Marsh’s command of writing is faultless. It is a pleasure to read her work.
            This novel includes more about the Detective-Inspector’s life, family and emotions than her other works, which her fans will enjoy. 

              Dashiell Hammett called the novel, “The best detective story I have ever read.” I give my highest recommendation to the novel.

7 comments:

Grace Topping said...

Your previous reviews of Ngaio Marsh's books got me hooked on them. I'll definitely add this one to my reading list. Thanks for the reviews.

Shari Randall said...

I'm getting hooked on these classic reads!

Margaret Turkevich said...

What fun! On my list.

Gloria Alden said...

Another good review, Warren. I'm sure I probably have one of his books buried somewhere. I'll have to look for them.

KM Rockwood said...

Ah, Warren. You keep adding to my TBR list!

Susan Oleksiw said...

Ngaio Marsh has long been one of my favorite writers. I'm so glad to see her books reviewed here. Time for a rereading of this one.

Margaret Morse said...

Thanks for the review. This is my favorite Ngaio Marsh mystery. I think it had more emotional involvement from her protagonist, Roderick Alleyn.