If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book next year, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our March author interviews: Karen Pullen (3/1), Lowcountry Crime authors: Tina Whittle, Polly Iyer, Jonathan M. Bryant, and James M. Jackson (3/8), Annette Dashofy (3/15), Edith Maxwell (3/22) and Barb Ross (3/29).

Saturday Guest Bloggers in March: Maris Soule (3/4), and Virginia Mackey (3/11). WWK Saturday bloggers write on 3/18--Margaret S. Hamilton and on 3/25--Kait Carson.

Julie Tollefson won the Mystery Writers of America Midwest Chapter's Holton Award for best unpublished manuscript (member category) for her work in progress, In The Shadows. Big news for a new year. Congratulations, Julie.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on June, 13, 2017. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Linda here in June!

Cross Genre Publications anthology, Hidden Youth, will contain Warren Bull's "The Girl, The Devil, and The Coal Mine." The anthology will be released in late November 2016. The We've Been Trumped anthology released by Dark House Press on September 28th contains Warren Bull's "The Wall" short story and KM Rockwood's "A Phone Call to the White House." KM writes under the name Pat Anne Sirs for this volume.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for pre-order.

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Friday, June 10, 2016

Nothing Can Rescue Me by Elizabeth Daly: A review by Warren Bull


Nothing Can Rescue Me by Elizabeth Daly: A review by Warren Bull

Nothing Can Rescue Me was published in 1943. Elizabeth Daly was a prolific and popular author during the Golden Age of mystery writing. Her detective, Henry Gamadge, was called, “The American Peter Wimsey.” Agatha Christie was one of her biggest fans. The author considered the mystery novel at its best to be a high form of literature. She did not start writing mysteries until she was past sixty.

It will come as no surprise that the novel takes place in an elegant country estate where a collection of family members, friends and servants gather around a wealthy matriarch. Unlike many novels of the time, the setting is America. Gamadge is called to investigate when a series of ominous messages appear typed into the manuscript of a novel Florence Hutter is writing. One guest fears evil spirits were unleashed unknowingly by the Grande Dame, herself, when she used an Ouija board.
There is a maturity and well-honed ease in the writing. The basic plot avoids becoming yet another cliché by the craft of the writer. It is written for an educated audience. I had to look up three terms in the dictionary. In fact, in another book by this author I was unable to find the meaning of two phrases she used. A comparison with Agatha Christie is not unreasonable.

I enjoyed the book. I recommend it, but not as highly as books written by the Christie or, for that matter, Sayers. If the author lacks the genius of those two, what author does not?

6 comments:

KB Inglee said...

She sounds like an author worth looking up. I love the classic mysteries the way some people love old films. Thanks for the tip.

Margaret Turkevich said...

I'll keep Daly in mind. Sayers has always been my favorite, especially The Nine Tailors.

E. B. Davis said...

I love Sayers, too, Margaret. Have to admit, though, I'm intrigued by an American locked-door mystery.

Kait said...

Very intriguing, especially the US setting!

Gloria Alden said...


Sounds like another good one to read, Warren. Especially since I love Dorothy Sayers.

KM Rockwood said...

An author I don't know that I've encounter. Like everyone else, I'll have to look her up and see what I can find.