If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our September Author Interviews--9/6 Kathleen Valenti, 9/13 David Burnsworth, 9/20 Jeri Westerson, 9/27 Frances Brody. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.

September Saturday Guest Bloggers: 9/2--Anne Bannon, 9/9 WWK Bloggers, 9/16 Margaret S. Hamilton, 9/23 Kait Carson, and on 9/30 Trixie Stiletto.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.” In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.
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Friday, May 27, 2016

Apprehensions &Convictions by Mark Johnson: A Review by Warren Bull






Apprehensions &Convictions by Mark Johnson: A Review by Warren Bull

At age fifty, who would quit a well-respected administrative job in the non-profit world to take a seventy-five percent reduction in salary to wear a uniform that some people see as a symbol of oppression and others see as a target to shoot at? The who is Mark Johnson. In Apprehensions &Convictions: Adventures of a 50-year-old Rookie Cop, Johnson tells not only who, but also why and what happens as the result of his unorthodox decision. He tells it well.

The author goes into detail about what it is like to discover the body of someone who died weeks before. He talks about getting sucker punched and forced to fight. He also explains why cops don’t lose fights.  Whether it is a high speed chase at midnight or responding to a domestic dispute call where the victim as well as the perpetrator may at any moment turn on the cop who is trying to help, Johnson gives a description that may give you goose bumps or make you sweat. 


The authenticity and honesty with which he writes is remarkable.  If you write about cops or the sort of people who deal with cops frequently, this is a book that should be read and kept as a reference. You can put it right next to Adam Plantinga’s 400 Things Cops Know. 

3 comments:

Margaret Turkevich said...

The perfect companion to my recent stint in the citizen's police academy. Thanks for writing about it.

Gloria Alden said...

Sounds interesting, Warren. I'll have to look into it.

KM Rockwood said...

Interesting information.

I've never heard of a police department that hired people for patrol officers when they were this old, but obviously someone must. I believe in this case it was Mobile.

I have to admit I'm a bit disheartened to think that the United Way, a nonprofit charity, pays people four times as much as a beginning police officer. Most of us think of police work as solid middle class jobs, paying a living wage.