If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our August Author Interviews--8/2 Maggie Toussaint, 8/9 Kellye Garrett, 8/16 Matt Ferraz, 8/23 Matthew Iden, 8/30 Julia Buckley. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.

August Saturday Guest Bloggers: 8/5--Kathleen Kaska, 8/12 Triss Stein, WWK bloggers-Margaret S. Hamilton on 8/19 and Kait Carson on 8/26. Look for E. B. Davis's blog on 8/29--the fifth Tuesday of August.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.”

In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on October, 18, 2017. Look for the interview by E. B. Davis here on that date!

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Thursday, March 17, 2016

SAINT PATRICK


Today our country and much of the world, celebrates Saint Patrick’s Day, especially in Ireland, where Saint Patrick is their patron saint. Saint Patrick’s Day is considered the day of his death.
Saint Patrick was a 5th century Romano-British Christian missionary and bishop in Ireland known as the “Apostle of Ireland.” However, neither the date of his birth or death can be identified with certainty. Because I couldn’t locate my book of the saints, which was an old edition, I went to Wikipedia. All the following information is there and annotated with references. Because the information was pages and pages long, I shortened it.


There are many versions of his life, but the generally accepted one by modern scholars, is that Patrick, originally named Maewyn Succat, was born in 387 A.D. to the parents Calpernius and Conchessa. At the age of 16 in 403 AD Saint Patrick was captured by the Irish and sent to Ireland to serve as a slave herding and tending sheep in Dalriada. During his time in captivity Saint Patrick became fluent in the Irish language and culture. After six years he escaped captivity after hearing a voice urging him to travel to a distant port where a ship would be waiting to take him back to Britain. On his way back to Britain, he was captured again and spent sixty days in captivity in Tours, France. During his short captivity within France, Saint Patrick learned about French monasticism. At the end of his second captivity he had a vision.

St. Patrick recounts that vision he had a few years after returning home: “I saw a man coming, as it were from Ireland. His name was Victoricus, and he carried many letters, and he gave me one of them. I read the heading “The Voice of the Irish.” As I began the letter, I imagined in that moment I heard the voice of those very people who were near the wood of Foclut, which is beside the western sea – and they cried out, as with one voice: ‘We Appeal to you, holy servant boy, to come and walk among us.’”






Acting on the vision, Patrick returned to Ireland as a Christian missionary. However, tradition has it that St. Patrick was not welcomed by the locals where he landed and was forced to leave to seek a more welcoming landing place further north.  St. Patrick’s position as a foreigner in Ireland was not an easy one. His refusal to accept gifts from kings placed him outside the normal ties of kinship, fosterage, and affinity. Legally he was without protection and he says that on one occasion he was beaten, robbed of all he had, and put in chains, perhaps waiting execution. But with his knowledge of Irish language and culture, he brought Christianity and monasticism to Ireland in the form of more than 300 churches and over 100,000 Irish baptized. 


There are many legends regarding Saint Patrick. One is that he used the shamrock as an illustrative parable in teaching the Irish about the doctrine of the Holy Trinity, the Christian teaching of three persons in one God. This story first appears in writing in 1726, although it may be older. The shamrock has since become a central symbol for St. Patrick’s Day









Another legend is that St. Patrick banished all the snakes from Ireland. However, all evidence suggests that post-glacial Ireland never had snakes, and so far no serpent has successfully migrated across the open ocean to a new home in Ireland. Naturalist Nigel Monaghan, keeper of natural history at the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin, who has searched extensively through Irish fossil collections and records, says “At no time has there ever been a suggestion of snakes in Ireland, so there was nothing for St. Patrick to banish.”







One thing I found interesting was that although St. Patrick’s Day is a feast day in the Catholic Church, he has never been formally canonized by a Pope; nevertheless, various Christian churches declare that he is a Saint in Heaven, and he’s in the List of Saints. He is still widely venerated in Ireland and elsewhere today. One of our country’s largest cathedrals is St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City.





Do you celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day?
How much of this information did you already know?



11 comments:

E. B. Davis said...

I didn't know much about St. Patrick. I'm not Catholic or Irish, but I like the celebration. Green beer doesn't do much for me (beer in general doesn't), but I like corn beef, cabbage, potatoes, and Irish soda bread! Happy St. Pat's everyone! Remember to wear green.

James Montgomery Jackson said...

I once worked in New York City at 44th Street and 5th Avenue. Today was the one day that everyone in the office brought their lunch. No one wanted to go out into the crowds of drunken revealers. Now I live in Savannah, GA and it has the second largest St. Patrick’s Day celebration on the East Coasts. Open container laws will do that. I avoid the downtown as though it was filled with the poisonous snakes Patrick banned from Ireland.

~ Jim

Gloria Alden said...

E.B. I've never truly celebrated Saint Patrick, either, not even though I like corn beef, cabbage and potatoes. I don't remember eating Irish soda bread. However, even though I have only a smidgen of Irish, I do enjoy Celtic music and just about about everything to do with the Irish.

Jim, I didn't know that fact about Savannah, GA. I hate large raucous crowds so I wouldn't bother to celebrate anything anywhere. Well, I have been to a few political events that were fun, but the people weren't pushing or shoving.

Kait said...

As the product of a Catholic school, I knew a lot of about St. Patrick, the man and the myth. I didn't realize he wasn't an "official" Saint. Did somebody mention that to the folks that named St. Patrick's Cathedral?

Jim, we worked near each other, I worked in the building on the corner of 5th and 47th (above Michael C. Fina). The building had windows that opened and I used to sit on the sill and lean way out to watch the parade go down 5th Avenue every year, then follow that up with beers at the Pig and Whistle! I got out of work too late to make it to my regular pub, McCann's. They were packed from lunch on.

Margaret Turkevich said...

I didn't know St Patrick wasn't canonized, but St Christopher is in the same situation. Favorite saints anyway.

I grew up in New Jersey where St Patrick's Day and St Joseph's Day were celebrated. As an adult, I lived outside Cleveland, where the buzzards return to Hinckley on St Joseph's Day, as the swallows return to Mission San Juan Capistrano.

Shari Randall said...

Happy St. Patrick's Day! I'll make sure my Irish hubby gets his corned beef and cabbage, but green beer is a bridge too far. You wouldn't want to be spoiling perfectly good beer that way.
I didn't know St. Patrick wasn't official - news to this (Italian) Catholic school girl!

Gloria Alden said...

I had no idea St. Patrick wasn't cononized, either, until I decided to research him for this blog. I did know about St. Christopher, though. I'm very glad that Mother Theresa is going to be cononized soon.

Margaret, the buzzards returning to Hinkley is always in our local news every year. I live within easy driving distance of the place, but can't remember ever going there. I did know about the swallows return to the Mission San Juan Capistrano, and I visited that mission once with my daughter.

Warren Bull said...

Kansas City where I lived until last Christmas has a large Irish population. There was a gigantic parade that wound through my neighborhood and another more irreverent parade elsewhere called the "Snake Parade."

Gloria Alden said...

Warren, I would have liked to see the parade that wound through your neighbor hood. It would be nice to have a ringside seat for that. It would be so much nicer than being in large, and shoving and pushing crowds.

KM Rockwood said...

Since I grew up in an Irish family in a heavily Irish neighborhood, I knew most of that, including the fact that St. Patrick predated today's canonization system.

My mother was not Irish (German-Russian-English) but she was a retiring personality, and no one ever made a big deal about it. One of my uncles, however, did enter into a scandalous "mixed marriage"--he married an Orange woman!

Gloria Alden said...

KM, that's funny! Of course, that would be considered scandalous at the time. So much has changed since that time, but now I wonder if prejudices aren't increasing more and more today.